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Financial support

Family Caregiving and the Intergenerational Transmission of Poverty

The United States relies on uncompensated family caregivers to provide most of the long-term care required by older adults as they age. But such care comes at a significant financial cost to these caregivers in the form of lower lifetime earnings and diminished (or even no) Social Security retirement benefits, ineligibility for Medicare coverage of their healthcare costs, and minimal retirement savings.

Wed, 05/29/2019 - 12:46

Caregiving for Parents and In-Laws: Commonalities and Differences

This study examined support, stress, and well-being between adults who provide care for an aging and disabled parent and those who care for an aging and disabled parent-in-law. The study utilized a sample of individuals caring for a parent (n = 77), individuals caring for an in-law (n = 26) and a comparison group of noncaregivers (n = 1,939) from the Midlife Development in the United States study. In-law caregivers provided more financial assistance but adult child caregivers provided more emotional support and unpaid work.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Caring on the breadline: the financial implications of caring: executive summary

This report presents findings of a questionnaire-based survey of the financial position of carers in the UK conducted by the Carers National Association (CNA), the starting point of which was that government carers strategies published recently for England and Scotland have omitted to address carers' financial problems. The survey suggested that a large proportion of carers providing substantial care are faced with financial hardship.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Carer's aspirations and decisions around work and retirement

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) commissioned the Social Policy Research Unit at the University of York to conduct research exploring the aspirations and decisions around work and retirement of people looking after disabled or sick relatives, friends, or older people. The study involved three elements: a literature review; in-depth interviews with 80 carers; and focus groups with professionals from Jobcentre Plus, social services departments and carers organisations who worked with carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Supporting carers to care: report by the Comptroller and Auditor General

There are six million unpaid carers in the UK who look after relatives, friends, children or older people who are sick or disabled. The number of carers is growing and the Department for Work and Pensions (the Department) estimates that the number of carers it supports will increase by about a quarter by 2014-15. The nature of care obligations varies. Care may be provided throughout life, during a chronic condition, over distinct periods, or towards the end of a person’s life. Appendix One provides examples of caring responsibilities from our survey of carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09