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Co-design of a carers strategy for New South Wales: reflections on a new approach to collaborative policy making with carers

NSW is Australia's most populous state, with 7.7 million people (about a third of the Australian population). There are 905,000 carers in NSW. Carers provide ongoing unpaid support to people who need it because of their disability, chronic illness, mental ill-health, dementia or frail age.

Wed, 04/10/2019 - 15:45

Where are we now? Twenty-five years of research, policy and practice on young carers

It is more than 25 years since the critical dialogue on young carers was played out in the pages of this journal (see Morris and Keith, 1995; Aldridge and Becker, 1996). Since that time, research evidence has given us a clearer picture of the extent of young caring in the UK and its consequences for children and families, including two new national studies that focus on the prevalence and impact of young caring in England.

Thu, 08/23/2018 - 15:01

Informal carers count

The government strategy 'Caring About Carers' acknowledges that state care provision can never replace that of informal carers. Nurses working in primary and community health care potentially have a key role in identifying informal carers, meeting their health needs and ensuring they know of their rights to an assessment under the Carers Act. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

Planning ahead: meeting the needs of older people with intellectual disabilities in the United Kingdom

Despite the acknowledged increase in the number of older people with intellectual disabilities (ID) in the UK, the age-related health and social care needs of this population have yet to be fully understood and addressed. Although there is some evidence of positive development, the current picture of service provision is characterized by fragmentation and limited choice of resources and specialist care. Policy aims are variably met and inconsistently applied.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Valuing People: family matters ten years on

It is ten years since Valuing People promised a ‘new deal’ for family carers. Valuing People was explicitly concerned to ensure a cultural shift in the way services worked with and conceptualised the role of family carers. It included specific objectives for involving families in local partnership boards, providing better support for them in their caring role and investing in family leadership nationally, regionally and locally. This article considers why there was a need for a more family-focused approach to support.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Call us carers: limitations and risks in campaigning for recognition and exclusivity

This article comments on the current campaign by carers’ organizations for the title of carer to be used exclusively in connection with unpaid caring. This campaign is analysed in the context of recent developments in policies on unpaid caring and broader debates concerning recognition campaigns, identity and solidarity with others. It is argued that success for carers in terms of securing better benefits and services has been partial and limited and that there are problems in linking demands for recognition with demands for improved material conditions.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Private family arrangements and the welfare of adults who lack capacity: an analysis of the safeguarding vulnerable groups bill

The safeguarding vulnerable groups bill aims to improve the system of checks on staff and volunteers who want to work in social care, health or education. However, it creates different levels of protection for children and vulnerable adults. This article sets out the concerns expressed by a small coalition of disability charities that argued for improvements to the bill during its passage through Parliament.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Carers in Sweden: the public support they receive, and the support they desire

This article describes and analyses public support for Swedish unpaid carers, now mandated by law, and also the support that they desire, using surveys conducted in 2008, 2009, and later. Few carers helping someone in a different household – the large majority of the carers – received any support aimed directly at them, such as access to support groups, training, relief service, or financial support. Yet, most carers did not desire any support for themselves. They mostly wanted public services for the cared-for person, all of which may also indirectly support carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Involving NHS users and carers in healthcare education

This paper is based on a presentation delivered by the Special Interest Group for Education and Training (SIGET) at the annual Community Practitioners' and Health Visitors' Association (CPHVA) conference. Service user and carer involvement in all aspects of health care delivery, including the educational process, is a key element of the government's modernisation programme. This paper considers the policy context that requires nurse educationalists to seek the views of service users and carers in planning quality healthcare education programmes.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Caring on the breadline: the financial implications of caring: executive summary

This report presents findings of a questionnaire-based survey of the financial position of carers in the UK conducted by the Carers National Association (CNA), the starting point of which was that government carers strategies published recently for England and Scotland have omitted to address carers' financial problems. The survey suggested that a large proportion of carers providing substantial care are faced with financial hardship.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

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