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Long-term care

Are informal family caregivers stigmatized differently based on their gender or employment status?: a German study on public stigma towards informal long-term caregivers of older individuals

Background: Stigma and informal caregiving are determinants for health and wellbeing, but few studies have examined stigma towards informal caregiving. Public stigma may be expressed differently towards caregivers depending on their gender and employment status due to societal norms. Therefore, this study analyzes if there is a difference in public stigma shown by the general population toward informal caregivers of care recipients aged 65 years or older based on the observed caregiver’s gender or working status.

Thu, 08/18/2022 - 14:23

A comparison of caregiver burden between long-term care and developmental disability family caregivers

Background: As the United States’ population ages and health concerns rise, the family caregiver occupation will continue to be an integral part of the health care system. Aims: It is important to examine the burden that family caregivers experience so they can seek out additional training and services to maintain their own well-being. The researchers examined caregiver burden from a perspective of developmentally disabled and long-term care.

Wed, 08/10/2022 - 20:35

Willingness and preparedness to provide care: interviews with individuals of different ages and with different caregiving experiences

Background: At present, the provision of informal care to older relatives is an essential pillar of the long-term care system in Germany. However, the impact of demographic and social changes on informal caregiving remains unclear. Methods: Thirty-three semi-structured interviews were conducted with care consultants, informal caregivers and people without any caregiving experience to explore if people are willing to provide older adult care and how prepared these are with regard to the possibility of becoming care dependent themselves.

Fri, 07/22/2022 - 11:37

'You become their advocate': The experiences of family carers as advocates for older people with dementia living in residential aged care

Aims: The aim of this study was to identify features of well‐performing residential aged care services (RACS) as experienced by family carers. Background: Family carers can have an integral role in residential aged care providing social support and are well‐placed to engage with staff and monitor care. Design: A qualitative descriptive design was used. Semi‐structured face‐to‐face and telephone interviews were conducted with family carers of current or past residents of Australian RACS between November 2018 and January 2019.

Thu, 07/21/2022 - 17:43

‘My wife is my doctor at home’: A qualitative study exploring the challenges of home-based palliative care in a resource-poor setting

Background: Family caregiving is common globally, but when a family member needs palliative and end-of-life care, this requires knowledge and expertise in dealing with symptoms, medication, and treatment side effects. Caring for a family member with advanced prostate cancer in the home presents practical and emotional challenges, especially in resource-poor contexts, where there are increasing palliative cases without adequate palliative care institutions.

Thu, 06/09/2022 - 10:30

#MoreThanAVisitor: Families as "Essential" Care Partners During COVID-19

The public health response to the current Coronavirus pandemic in long-term care communities, including assisted living, encompasses prohibiting visitors. This ban, which includes family members, has been criticized for being unfair, unhealthy, and unsafe. Against this backdrop, I examine the roles family play in residents' daily lives and care routines.

Wed, 06/08/2022 - 19:13

Is informal care sufficient to meet the long-term care needs of older people with disabilities in China? Evidence from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Survey

Background: Rapid demographic shifts and socio-economic changes are fuelling concerns over the inadequate supply of informal care - the most common source of care-giving for older people in China. Unmet long-term care needs, which are believed to cause numerous adverse effects on health, continue to increase. Methods: Drawing data from the 2015 wave of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Survey, this study explores the relationship between informal care provision and unmet long-term care needs among older people in China.

Mon, 06/06/2022 - 22:47

Informal Care of Dependent Older People—Support Services and Funding Schemes

This chapter is dealing with aspects regarding informal care of dependent older people. Based on the analysis of the information obtained from the good practice and the informal care regulatory status in Romania, the authors proposed a set of support services and funding schemes that could be implemented in our country as follows: care leave and care allowance; palliative care leave; prolonged care leave; the employment of a personal assistant under the terms of the Framework Law no.

Mon, 06/06/2022 - 11:33

The Impact of Long-Term Care Policy on the Percentage of Older Adults With Disabilities Cared for by Family Members in China: A System Dynamics Simulation

Background: This study examined the impact of current and future long-term care (LTC) policies on the family caregiving burden in China. System dynamics (SD) methodology was used to construct an LTC delivery system model that simulates the demand of LTC, living options, and LTC service use for disabled older adults. Methods: The model was based on three policy variables including the proportion of payment from LTC insurance, the growth rate of beds in LTC institutions, and the time to adjusting the capacity of community-based care.

Sun, 06/05/2022 - 16:02

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