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  2. How does she do it all? Effects of education on reconciliation of employment and informal caregiving among Austrian women

How does she do it all? Effects of education on reconciliation of employment and informal caregiving among Austrian women

Background: The introduction of reforms to the Austrian pension system in the early 2000s resulted in a significant increase in the employment rate of older working age women. This increase was highly differentiated along education groups, with increases in employment rates concentrated among those with secondary and tertiary education. Methods: Logistic regression analysis is applied to SHARE data from waves 1 and 6, to determine whether the increase in labour market participation of women aged 50+ in Austria has affected informal caregiving across education lines. Results: Unlike their secondary and tertiary educated counterparts, lower educated women were more likely to provide high intensity care in 2015 than in 2004, resulting in an education gradient that was not present before. In comparison, the overall probability to provide care has not changed significantly, irrespective of older women's education. Other possible adjustments were also explored, such as decreased participation in social activities or higher care burden. There is also limited evidence of compensation by increased informal care provision among men. Conclusions: Both employment and informal care provision have become more segmented in Austria in the wake of the pension reforms of 2004.

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Key Information

Type of Reference
Jour
Type of Work
Journal article
Publisher
John Wiley
ISBN/ISSN
01445596
Publication Year
2021
Issue Number
7
Journal Titles
Social Policy and Administration
Volume Number
55
Start Page
1162
End Page
1180