Skip to content

Toggle service links
Subscribe to RSS - policy

You are here

  1. Home
  2. policy

policy

Factors associated with nursing home entry for older people in Taiwan Republic of China

Taiwan is facing a rapid change in the composition of its population. As the population ages, a greater demand for long-term care services and, in particular, nursing homes is expected. Before deciding who really needs nursing home care, it is important for policy makers to understand the current pattern of utilisation and what factors are associated with entry. This research assesses the relative importance of predisposing, enabling and need factors that lie behind this.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Burstow to shift carers' funding in bid to improve quality of life

Caring with Confidence fund to be transferred to training and support projects. [Journal abstract]

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Listening to children: Meeting the needs of young carers

This chapter examines the impact of caring on the lives of young people (i.e. those under 18). The authors point to the difficulties in enumerating such carers. They estimate numbers in excess of 50,000. Although the issue of young caring is not new, research into the phenomenon is. The authors refer to the initial studies of the late 1980s and early 1990s. They focus on the work of the Young Carers Research Group (YCRG), established in 1992. The Group has an on-going work programme which aims to give young carers a voice, raise awareness and influence policy.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Grounding constructions of carers: Exploring the experiences of carers through a grounded approach

Social and political constructions of carers have been criticized for undervaluing the complexities of the experiences of carers. However, relatively little research has attempted to generate more meaningful constructions of carers by drawing these considerations together. The purpose of this article is to begin addressing this need. To accomplish this, the article is presented in two sections. First, an overview is provided on the current constructions of carers and suggested considerations for research.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

What is elder abuse - who decides?

Objectives: To test the hypothesis that family and professional caregivers have different views about what constitutes elder abuse.

Design: A vignette was given to family and professional carers. They were asked to rate 13 management strategies for behavioural difficulties in a person with dementia on a Likert scale ranging from good idea to abusive. Some of the strategies were abusive according to the Department of Health's ‘No Secrets’ definition.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Crucial impact of the world surrounding care

In this fourth of five articles on developing a benchmarking tool for person-centred care, Caroline Baker, Paul Edwards and Tracy Packer describe the last two factors: carer involvement and organisational strategy.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Employment and caring in British and Norwegian banking: an exploration through individual careers

The continuing expansion of women's employment has increasingly focused attention on the question of how the caring work traditionally carried out by unpaid women will be accomplished. In particular, how can caring responsibilities be combined with a long-term career? In this paper, we assess the significance of the national context through a comparison of the biographies of career bank managers, male and female, in Britain and Norway.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Eldercare and employed caregivers: a public/private responsibility?

The National Alliance for Caregiving (NAC) and the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) have reported that 21% of the U.S. population provides family caregiving services to someone over 18 years old. Seventy-nine percent (79%) of these caregivers provide care for someone aged 50 or older. The majority of caregivers work full or part-time, and nearly two-thirds of employed caregivers make work-related adjustments in order to provide care (NAC & AARP, 2004).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

LEAP framework

The LEAP (learning, evaluation and planning) framework is a toolkit designed to support a partnership approach to achieving change and improvement in the quality of community life. It has been used by policy makers, practitioners, and community activists in the fields of health education; adult learning; volunteering; and environmental planning. The framework will be of interest to anyone interested in using a partnership approach to improving outcomes for communities, service users and carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Developing a joint mental health strategy for elders

Reports on the development of a joint mental health strategy for older people in a central London Borough. The project brought together clinicians and practitioners from a variety of settings, the voluntary sector, and users and carers. The aim of the project was to develop a shared philosophy of care based on promoting independence and from this to identify the components of a spectrum of care that would meet the wide range of needs of elders with mental ill health. The borough had high levels of deprivation, unemployment and poor housing.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10