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Quality improvement

Enhancing Residents' Warmth in Greeting Caregivers: An Inpatient Intervention to Improve Family-Centered Communication

Background: Hospitals are increasingly motivated to improve the patient and family experience and increase patient satisfaction scores. The manner by which a provider greets patients and their families sets the tone for the hospital stay. This study aimed to improve residents' greetings of caregivers in the inpatient pediatric setting to improve family-centered communication. Methods: The study was conducted from October 2017 to April 2018 at a single, urban children's hospital on a unit with patients primarily, 5 years old.

Tue, 02/22/2022 - 12:48

To improve the communication between a community mental health team and its service users, their families and carers

This article describes the application of quality improvement (QI) to solve a long-standing, ongoing problem where service users or their carers felt they were not given enough information regarding diagnosis and medication during clinic assessments in a community mental health setting. Service users and carers had shared feedback that some of the information documented on clinic letters was not accurate and the service users were not given the opportunity to discuss these letters with the clinician.

Tue, 04/13/2021 - 12:44

Improving the Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) process: A qualitative study of family caregiver perspectives

Objective: The road to legalization of Medical Assistance in Dying (MAID) across Canada has largely focused on legislative details such as eligibility and establishment of regulatory clinical practice standards. Details on how to implement high-quality, person-centered MAID programs at the institutional level are lacking.

Fri, 01/24/2020 - 11:49

Prioritizing problems in and solutions to homecare safety of people with dementia: supporting carers, streamlining care

Background: Dementia care is predominantly provided by carers in home settings. We aimed to identify the priorities for homecare safety of people with dementia according to dementia health and social care professionals using a novel priority-setting method.; Methods: The project steering group determined the scope, the context and the criteria for prioritization. We then invited 185 North-West London clinicians via an open-ended questionnaire to identify three main problems and solutions relating to homecare safety of people with dementia.

Wed, 11/21/2018 - 12:51

Supporting carers : early interventions and better outcomes

Over the last two years we have been working together to take forward the National Carers' Strategy, published in 2008, in the context of more personalised support and sustained independence for carers and service users. This paper is the third in a sequence of short reviews designed to stimulate debate and improve the support for carers. At a time when we face many challenges around resources it is doubly important that we keep our sights firmly on the improved outcomes that can be secured through early intervention and preventative support. The review contains five key messages.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

Commissioning better outcomes for carers : and knowing if you have : a local needs and response audit support tool

We have been working together to take forward The National Carers’ Strategy, published in 2008 alongside the promotion of more personalised support and sustained independence. This paper is the fourth in a sequence of short reviews designed to stimulate debate and improve support for carers. It links closely to Commissioning for Carers [2009]. The focus of this paper is to help us all to tackle the following question: How will you, carers, and people more generally know if you have improved outcomes for people who give and receive care and support? It is a question not easily answered.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Informal carers' health-related quality of life and patient experience in primary care: evidence from 195,364 carers in England responding to a national survey

Background: We aim to describe the health-related quality of life of informal carers and their experiences of primary care.

Methods: Responses from the 2011-12 English General Practice Patient Survey, including 195,364 informal carers, were analysed using mixed effect logistic regressions controlling for age, gender, ethnicity and social deprivation to describe carer health-related quality of life (mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain, and anxiety/depression, measured using EQ-5D) and primary care experience (access, continuity and communication).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

How to stay afloat

Researcher Elinor Nicholas describes how support for carers could be improved even where resources are limited.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18