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Current Advances in Palliative & Hospice Care: Problems and Needs of Relatives and Family Caregivers During Palliative and Hospice Care-An Overview of Current Literature

Palliative and hospice care aims to improve quality of life of patients' relatives, but still little is known about their specific problems and needs. We present a comprehensive literature update. Narrative review to present an expert overview of peer-reviewed, English-written original research publications and reviews on psychosocial and existential problems, supportive needs as well as interventions for relatives during the patients' disease trajectory published between January 2017 and November 2018. A total of 64 publications were included.

Wed, 06/26/2019 - 13:26

Family Caregivers and the Decisions They Make

Kennedy talks about the importance of family caregivers. Among other things, making sure that family caregivers are prepared prior to discharge in understanding the family members diagnosis and what it means for ongoing care, how to provide care, and what changes signal the need for professional intervention.

Fri, 06/07/2019 - 15:11

Living under a cloud of threat: the experience of Iranian female caregivers with a first-degree relative with breast cancer

Backgrounds Breast cancer is a global threat to all women, especially those having close relatives with breast cancer. Women who were caregivers to relatives with breast cancer are more vulnerable to stress caused by the perception of heightened risk of cancer. Because health measures and breast health are affected by cultural beliefs and social status, information about breast cancer should consider the cultural beliefs and values of the society.

Tue, 05/14/2019 - 13:05

Carers’ experience of memory screening tests

Background: Current evidence suggests that patients with dementia find memory tests humiliating and embarrassing. However, the knowledge concerning carers’ experience of witnessing patients with dementia undergo memory screening has not been fully explored.

Aims: This study was to explore the experiences of relatives of patients with dementia witnessing memory-screening tests.

Mon, 05/13/2019 - 15:04

Dignity in people with frontotemporal dementia and similar disorders - a qualitative study of the perspective of family caregivers

Background Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) constitutes on average 10-15% of dementia in younger persons (≤65 years old), but can also affect older people. These patients demonstrate a decline in social conduct, and/or language aphasias, apathy, and loss of insight that is gradual and progressive. Preservation of dignity seems to be highly relevant both before and after admission to different types of institutionalized care, but the research is scant.

Fri, 04/12/2019 - 15:17

Perceptions of psychosis, coping, appraisals, and psychological distress in the relatives of patients with schizophrenia: an exploration using self-regulation theory

OBJECTIVE: Following Leventhal's self-regulation model, the purpose of the present study was to provide an examination of the relationship between psychosis perceptions, coping strategies, appraisals, and distress in the relatives of patients with schizophrenia.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Working with family carers of people with dementia: 'negotiated' coping as an essential outcome

Supporting family carers is likely to remain at the forefront of community care policy in dementia care for the foreseeable future. However, despite extensive research in the area there is little evidence for the effectiveness of current interventions. Using data from an Australian study of how carers of people with dementia cope with the challenges they face, this article calls for a re-appraisal of the ways in which a successful intervention is defined and promotes an approach based on partnership in which carers themselves play a significant role in determining 'what works'.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

The Oxford Friends and Family Empowerment (OFAFE) service: support and education for those affected by friends or family with personality disorder

The Oxford Friends and Family Empowerment (OFAFE) service is a carer support service that originated in a collaboration between the Oxfordshire Complex Needs Service and the national mental health charity Rethink. OFAFE provides support and education for adults supporting an individual with a personality disorder. This paper describes the background and operation of the OFAFE service, along with the early stages of the development of a similar service for young carers, the Young Friends and Family Empowerment (YFAFE) service.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22

Cooking up a problem in the kitchen

Changes in cooking, food preparation and eating habits may give rise to concern among relatives of people with dementia. Jill Manthorpe, Roger Watson and Anne Stimpson report on survey findings on this theme, and draw out messages for services

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Continuing to care

Reports on a collaborative study of carers from across North Wales, whose relatives have moved to live in a care home. Interviews were conducted with 78 family carers whos relative had been recently admitted into a care home. Follow-up interviews were conducted 10-12 months later with a sub-sample of 29 carers. Discusses the the carers experiences and the implications for staff working in care homes. The research was conducted by the Centre for Social Policy Research and Development, University of Wales and the Princess Royal Trust for Carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18