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Self-care

Supporting self-care of long-term conditions in people with dementia: A systematic review

Background: Long-term conditions are common in people living with dementia; their self-management is an important determinant of wellbeing. Family carers often support or substitute self-care activities, and act as proxies for self-management, as dementia progresses. Objectives: To conduct the first systematic review of how management of long-term conditions in people with dementia is best enabled and supported, including factors that facilitate or inhibit self-management and management by a proxy. Design: Systematic review.

Tue, 06/28/2022 - 17:01

Self-Care for Caregivers of Individuals Living With Multiple Sclerosis: Testing Mediation Models of Caregiver Stress, Health, and Self-Care

Background: Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) often receive home health care, yet little research investigates the health of informal caregivers of individuals with MS. Methods: We tested a mediation model in which associations between caregiver stress and caregiver self-care were explained by each of four a priori caregiver health factors—caregiver negative affect, pain, tiredness, and functional limitations.

Sat, 06/18/2022 - 20:37

Self‐care experiences of Pakistani patients with COPD and the role of family in self‐care: A phenomenological inquiry

Background: Self‐care enables patients in improving quality of life and reducing hospital admissions. Research explored the experiences of patients about breathlessness, sleep problems and complication management in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the self‐care experiences and the role of the family in self‐care are underexplored. Objectives: This study aimed to understand the self‐care experiences of patients with COPD and explore the role of the family in self‐care.

Sat, 06/18/2022 - 16:23

Mindfulness- and compassion-based interventions for family carers of older adults: A scoping review

Objectives: To provide an overview of the current use of mindfulness- and compassion-based interventions with family carers of older adults, to aid primary healthcare practitioners in their decision-making around referral to wider healthcare services. The study was guided by four research questions: what interventions are currently used; whom they are used with; why they are used; and their evidence-base in terms of acceptability and effectiveness. Methods: A scoping study using the methodological frameworks of Arksey and O'Malley and Levac et al.

Wed, 06/08/2022 - 15:07

The Lived Experience of Patients and Family Caregivers in Managing Pneumoconiosis

Background: The daily challenges of patients with pneumoconiosis and their caregivers in living with and providing care for this disease remain unexplored. Methods and findings: As guided by the interpretive description, we found that pneumoconiosis patients suffered from highly anxiety-provoking symptoms and physical debilitation, which evoked high levels of distress and sense of impending death. The reduced functional capacity disrupted patients' role functioning and self-esteem.

Tue, 06/07/2022 - 19:04

Lessons learned from the implementation of a video health coaching technology intervention to improve self‐care of family caregivers of adults with heart failure

Background: Individuals with heart failure (HF) typically live in the community and are cared for at home by family caregivers. These caregivers often lack supportive services and the time to access those services when available. Technology can play a role in conveniently bringing needed support to these caregivers. Objectives: The purpose of this article is to describe the implementation of a virtual health coaching intervention with caregivers of HF patients (“Virtual Caregiver Coach for You”—ViCCY).

Tue, 06/07/2022 - 13:29

Involvement in self‐care and psychological well‐being of Spanish family caregivers of relatives with dementia

Background: The provision of continuous care to a dependent person can lead to a lack of self‐care by the caregiver themselves with corresponding low levels of well‐being. This well‐being has been analysed mostly from within the perspective of the hedonic tradition, with the development of personal growth often being overlooked.

Mon, 06/06/2022 - 22:35

“I can’t live like that”: the experience of caregiver stress of caring for a relative with substance use disorder

Background: The impact of addiction extends beyond the individual using a substance. Caring for an individual with addiction creates persistent stressful circumstances that cause worry, anger, depression, shame, guilt, anxiety, and behavioral problems within the family unit. The aim of the study: The paper aims to explore the experiences of caring for a relative with a substance use disorder (SUD) and self-care strategies caregivers employ. Methods: The study adopted an exploratory qualitative design.

Fri, 06/03/2022 - 16:53

Heart Failure Caregiver Self-Care: A Latent Class Analysis

Background: Little is known about heart failure (HF) caregiver self-care. Methods: This article reports a secondary analysis of data from a cross-sectional, descriptive study involving 530 HF caregivers. A three-step latent class mixture model identified HF caregiver classes at risk for poor self-care and examined the relationship between the identified self-care classes and caregiver burden and depression. Caregivers completed online surveys on self-care, caregiver burden, depression, problem-solving, social support, and family function.

Fri, 06/03/2022 - 14:12

Effect of handholding on heart rate variability in both patients with cancer and their family caregivers: a randomized crossover study

Background: Many family caregivers of patients with cancer feel guilty about self-care. A meaningful relationship with patients reduces such negative feelings and functions as self-care for family caregivers. Moreover, handholding improves autonomic functions in non-cancer patients. However, the effects of handholding on both patients with cancer and family caregivers remain unknown. Methods: We evaluated the effects of handholding on heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with cancer and their family caregivers.

Thu, 02/10/2022 - 16:16

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