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Self-care

A systematic review of heart failure dyadic self-care interventions focusing on intervention components, contexts, and outcomes

Background: Having support from an informal carer is important for heart failure patients. Carers have the potential to improve patient self-care. At the same time, it should be acknowledged that caregiving could affect the carer negatively and cause emotional reactions of burden and stress. Dyadic (patient and informal carer) heart failure self-care interventions seek to improve patient self-care such as adherence to medical treatment, exercise training, symptom monitoring and symptom management when needed.

Wed, 01/23/2019 - 16:12

Heart Failure Self-care Within the Context of Patient and Informal Caregiver Dyadic Engagement: A Mixed Methods Study

Background: Recent heart failure (HF) patient and informal caregiver (eg, dyadic) studies have either examined self-care from a qualitative or quantitative perspective. To date, the 2 types of data have not been integrated.; Objective: The aim of this study was to understand HF self-care within the context of dyadic engagement.; Methods: This was a cross-sectional, mixed methods (quantitative/qualitative) study.

Wed, 01/23/2019 - 15:58

Dyadic incongruence in chronic heart failure: Implications for patient and carer psychological health and self-care

Aims and Objectives: To examine whether chronic heart failure patient-carer dyads who disagree about the division of illness management tasks (incongruent) experience poorer psychosocial health and self-care, than those who agree (congruent).; Background: Informal carers often assist patients with chronic heart failure in the complex management of their illness, but little is known about how relationship dynamics may affect psychosocial health.; Design: A prospective cross-sectional study was adopted with a purposeful sample of 25 chronic h

Wed, 12/19/2018 - 11:32

Self-Care Hub in Kirklees

Kirklees Council has taken up the strategic challenge to develop a Self-Care Hub, making the best use of technology to support local citizens living with a variety of long-term health conditions (LTCs). With increasing pressure on budgets and time, some service users with a LTC may see professionals for as little as an hour a year. It is therefore important to facilitate more self-care by service users.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

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