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The meanings of 'culture' in health and social care: a case study of the combined trust in Somerset

On the 1st of April 1999 Somerset Health Authority and Somerset County Council established a Joint Commissioning Board (JCB) to commission mental health services. Simultaneously, the Somerset Partnerships Health and Social Care NHS Trust was set-up as a combined health and social care services provider; for the first time in England, the majority of social services mental health staff transferred their employment to this Trust. The JCB commissioned an evaluation of the impact of these innovations on users and carers, staff and senior officers and members in the organisations concerned.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Improving the lives of people with dementia and their carers: the Prime Minister's challenge and a challenge for us all

The profile of adult social care has probably never been higher and one of the biggest questions is how to manage demographic pressures on services as resources reduce, while aiming to improve outcomes and maintain quality. One group which brings these issues into sharp focus is the rising number of people with dementia and their carers. In this particular instance we have the additional focus given by the launch of the Prime Minister's dementia challenge.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Literature review: use of respite by carers of people with dementia

Respite care is a cornerstone service for the home management of people with dementia. It is used by carers to mitigate the stress related to the demands of caring by allowing time for them to rest and do things for themselves, thus maintaining the caring relationship at home and perhaps forestalling long-term placement in a residential aged care facility. Despite numerous anecdotal reports in support of respite care, its uptake by carers of people with dementia remains relatively low.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Ageing and people with learning disabilities: in search of evidence

Background: Growing numbers of people with learning disabilities are now living into older age. This study aims to examine the state of knowledge about their lives and the challenges that ageing has for both family carers and policymakers and practitioners.

Materials and Methods: The article synthesises existing research in the fields of learning disability, ageing and family and social care with a view to learning lessons from these separate fields, identifying possibilities for collaboration and identifying gaps in knowledge.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

The experiences and needs of young adult carers in the UK

The UK’s 290,000 young carers aged 16 to 24 often fall into the gap between adults’ and children’s services. Researcher Alison Petch reports

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Development of the carer well-being and support (CWS) questionnaire

Purpose – A psychometrically validated measure is needed to evaluate outcomes in carers of people with mental health problems, including dementia. This study aims to develop and validate the Carer well‐being and support questionnaire (CWS).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Carers’ perspectives on the internet: implications for social and health care service provision

To date, little is known about carers’ experience of using online services and informa­tion. Data are reported from the Carers Online national postal survey of 3,014 adult carers and from an assisted access study involving 60 other adults who had been given training and cost-free Internet access at home. Half of the survey respondents reported having used the Internet on at least one occasion for a range of purposes related to both caring and other aspects of their lives.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Long-term care use and supply in Europe: projections for Germany, the Netherlands, Spain and Poland

This report presents results of projections of use and supply of long-term care for older persons in four countries representative of different long-term care systems: Germany, the Netherlands, Spain and Poland. Using a standardised methodology, the projections show that between 2010 and 2060, the numbers of users of residential care, formal home care and informal care are projected to increase in all countries, but at different rates. The results also indicate that if current patterns of care use and supply prevail, supply of informal and formal care is likely to fall behind demand.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

From independence to interdependence: integration means 'think family'

This article reviews current policies and their impact on carers' lives, and highlights the potential limitations of a more personalised approach to care. Using some key research findings and illustrative case studies, the article argues that we should build on the achievements of the personalisation reforms, but not limit our ambition to offering individuals more choice and control over their services. Instead, there should be a focus on individuals achieving ordinary life chances and families achieving emotional and financial sustainability.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13