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Gender, caring and employment in Britain

Employment and social policies continue to be based upon a gender template that assumes women, especially mothers, are or should be natural carers. Invariably, policies that seek to promote women's entry to paid work do so by facilitating their management and conduct of caring work, thus reinforcing the gender template. In addition, contemporary debates around concepts of citizenship emphasise the obligation to paid employment but fail to tackle the gendered division of caring activities and organisation of care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Transitions into informal caregiving and out of paid employment of women in their 50s

Data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health were used to study the order of events leading to informal caregiving and changes in labour force participation in mid-aged women, taking into account health and socioeconomic status. This analysis included 9857 women who responded to the third (2001) and fourth (2004) surveys and provided data for the caring and employment variables used. Caring was defined as providing care for an ill, frail or disabled person at least 7 h/wk. Between 2001 and 2004, the proportion of women caring increased from 12 to 14%.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Learning while caring

In this article the author discusses the learning and support needs of older women who, because they cared for elderly relatives, found it difficult to attend classes. She contends that there exists a gap in awareness and equal opportunities provision. In an in-depth investigation of the Government's new Access to Learning Fund (ALF) in relation to part-time students, the author found some considerable discrepancies.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Informal care in farming families in Northern Ireland: some considerations for social work

This paper is the result of a study of the dynamics of care-giving within farming families in Northern Ireland. It is argued that whilst much is known about informal care, existing knowledge is largely urban based and quantitative, and therefore limited. Following in-depth interviews with 'farm wives' it is concluded that for these women care-giving patterns are dependent on a particular set of cultural expectations and norms. Within farming families there is much resistance to becoming involved with formal social services.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Why the difference? Advice on breast examination given to carers of women who have learning disability and to women who do not

This article is about carers being discouraged from performing regular breast examinations for women who have a learning disability and who are unable to perform it upon themselves. This follows guidelines issued by the Cancer Screening Programme in 2000. The article looks at the need to perform breast examination, draws on feminist thought and explores the possible reasons for the guidelines, focusing on issues of abuse, consent and who should perform the examination.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

The experience and management of menstruation for women with learning disabilities

This paper describes a three‐phase study to investigate the experience and management of menstruation for women with learning disabilities. It focuses on the findings of the second phase of the study, which looked at the experiences of carers and health professionals. It describes the difficult issues that can arise when providing assistance around menstruation. The findings are discussed in relation to ideologies and sensitivities that exist around gender, sexuality and menstruation.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Women at the crossroads : a literature review of the mental health risks facing women in mid-life

This review focuses upon women aged 45-60: an under-researched subgroup of the adult female population. Women in mid-life occupy a unique position in the lifespan at the intersection of a number of age-related and lifelong pathways. The lives of these women can be distinguished from those of both older and younger women along a number of important dimensions including their family and working lives, economic situation, general health, and the complexity of their roles both inside and outside the home.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Carer knowledge and experiences with menopause in women with intellectual disabilities

Overall life expectancy for women with intellectual disabilities (ID) is now significantly extended, and many will live long enough to experience menopause. Little is known about how carers support women with ID through this important stage in their lives. This study investigated carer knowledge of how menopause affects women with ID under their care and how they may help them to cope with it.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Depressive symptoms in older female carers of adults with intellectual disabilities

Background  This survey study aims to examine the prevalence and factors associated with depressive symptoms among primary older female family carers of adults with intellectual disabilities (ID).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Baby-boomers and the ‘denaturalisation’ of care-giving in Quebec

The North American post-war generation, known as the baby-boomers, has challenged traditional family relations and the sexual division of labour. How do these challenges play out in the face of frail, ill or disabled family members? A study undertaken in Montreal, Quebec, with baby-boomer care-givers aimed to raise understanding of the realities of this group.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13