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Women

Simultaneous care for parents and care for children among mid-life British women and men

This article investigates care provided to parents and parents-in-law by mid-life adults with dependent children at home. Data from the General Household Survey are used first to estimate the prevalence of this 'two-way' care over the past decade, and second to develop forecasts of two-way care for a generation of women who have just finished their childbearing years. Having a higher education qualification is associated with later ages both of caring for parents and of having children at home.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Citizenship, migration and the value of care in the European Union

This paper examines the relationship between care and mobility. It does so within the specific context of intra‐EU migration and the development of European citizenship. Citizenship of the Union bestows valuable social rights on mobile community nationals. Entitlement under the provisions is not, however, universal but conditional and privileges those in paid work.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Effect of perceived stigmatisation on the quality of life among ageing female family carers: a comparison of carers of adults with intellectual disability and carers of adults with mental illness

BACKGROUND: Little account has been taken of quality of life (QoL) among family carers of adults with an intellectual disability (ID) and family carers of adults with a mental illness (MI), particularly the female ageing carers' perceived stigma. We explore whether there are differences in the significant predictors of female ageing family carers' QoL between family carers of adults with ID and family carers of adults with MI and aim to examine the effect of these differences in stigma on carer QoL between the two groups.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Employment and caring in British and Norwegian banking: an exploration through individual careers

The continuing expansion of women's employment has increasingly focused attention on the question of how the caring work traditionally carried out by unpaid women will be accomplished. In particular, how can caring responsibilities be combined with a long-term career? In this paper, we assess the significance of the national context through a comparison of the biographies of career bank managers, male and female, in Britain and Norway.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Advocating for a parent with dementia in a long-term care facility: The process experienced by daughters

Daughter caregivers of elders with dementia become their parents' advocates over time. This role takes on even greater importance when one or both parents are placed in a long-term care facility. This article presents the results of a qualitative study aimed at explaining how this advocacy role evolves following institutionalisation. In-depth interviews were conducted with daughters (N = 14) of an institutionalised parent with dementia and selected using a theoretical sampling procedure.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Informal care and caregiver's health

This study aims to measure the causal effect of informal caregiving on the health and health care use of women who are caregivers, using instrumental variables. We use data from South Korea, where daughters and daughters-in-law are the prevalent source of caregivers for frail elderly parents and parents-in-law.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Effect of caring for an older person on women's lifetime participation in work

This paper examines the relationship between informal care and ending paid work for working women of three age groups (up to 30, 31–49 and 50 or more years) in 1995 in Belgium. It explores the effect of being a carer for older adults on the probability of ceasing to work. Most particularly, it focuses on the effect of the care intensity in the different age groups. The analyses use data from the European Community Household Panel (ECHP). A sample of 24,592 working women living in 11 European countries was followed from 1995 to 2001.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Pre-menstrual syndrome in women with Down Syndrome

Background  Prevalence of pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) may be higher in women with Down syndrome due to syndrome specific characteristics in biochemistry, psychopathology and lifestyle. Recognition of PMS may be difficult for women with intellectual disabilities and their carers.

Method  A daily diary, used to diagnose PMS with typical women, was adapted. Following its validation, the diary was completed by 33 women with Down syndrome, then adapted, and completed by a further 32 women with Down syndrome/carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Predicting mental health outcomes in female working carers: a longitudinal analysis

This study investigated the factors contributing to psychological distress and positive affect over time in female working carers of older people. Questionnaires (including measures of work-related, care-related, interpersonal and psychological aspects of working and caring) were distributed to 275 female working carers in the UK, the majority of whom were working as nurses in the National Health Service. In cross-sectional analyses, higher work stress and work demands predicted higher psychological distress among respondents.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

The nature and extent of help given to women with intellectual disabilities to manage menstruation

Background Menstruation has been shown to be problematic for many women with intellectual disabilities. There has been a greater focus on menstrual suppression or elimination than on help and training to manage menstrual care successfully. Method A cross‐sectional questionnaire survey was conducted in England to investigate the help and training currently given to women with intellectual disabilities. Results Twenty‐nine percent of the women had never been given the opportunity to learn how to manage their own menstrual care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:08