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Active ageing among older adults with lifelong intellectual disabilities: the role of familial and nonfamilial social networks

Little research has examined the extent to which active ageing is facilitated by family and nonfamilial support persons of older adults with intellectual disabilities. This study explores the role played by key unpaid carers/support persons of older adults with lifelong intellectual disabilities in facilitating “active ageing.” All key social network members conceived active ageing to mean ongoing activity. Family and extended family members were found to play a crucial role in facilitating independent living and providing opportunities for recreational pursuits for those living in group homes. Members of religious organizations and group home staff provided the same types of opportunities where family support was absent. The findings suggest the need for improvements in resource provision, staff training, and group home policy and building design.

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Additional Titles
Families in Society

Key Information

Type of Reference
Jour
ISBN/ISSN
1044-3894
Resource Database
Social care online
Publication Year
2012
Issue Number
1
Volume Number
93
Start Page
55-64