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Women's perspectives on home‐based care for family members with chronic illness: An Interpretive phenomenology study

The number of people with chronic illness who need home‐based care is increasing globally. Home‐based care is socially constructed to be work carried out by women. However, little attention has been paid to the opinions of middle‐aged women caring for family members with chronic illness at home. In this study, Thai women's perspectives on home‐based care for family members with chronic illness using interpretive phenomenology were identified. Fifteen middle‐aged women were interviewed twice, and the data were analyzed using thematic analysis. Four major themes emerged: (i) role obligation; (ii) social life change; (iii) doing good things; and (iv) lack of support. Important findings were that care was considered a woman's duty owing to cultural beliefs. Most participants sacrificed their own needs to care for others, as doing good things is considered an important Buddhist belief. Caring for others decreased women's social networks, but they cared more for their own health. Support with finances, information, workplaces, and care recipients should be provided to women with care responsibilities. These results can help nurses to better understand women's caring roles and the consequences of home‐based care that influence woman's health.

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Key Information

Type of Reference
Jour
Type of Work
Journal article
Publisher
Wiley-blackwell
ISBN/ISSN
1441-0745
Publication Year
2018
Issue Number
4
Journal Titles
Nursing & Health Sciences
Volume Number
20
Start Page
494
End Page
501