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Gaps in end-of-life care and lack of support for family carers in Poland and Central Eastern Europe

The growth of life expectancy in Central Eastern Europe and increase in the number of older people in that region are the consequences of changes in the 1990s period, connected to transition from the communism into a market economy. Central Eastern Europe is already facing consequences of fast ageing and insufficient development of state health care and social services. Those result in gaps in the provision of end-of-life care and overburden of family caregivers.

Fri, 07/23/2021 - 16:10

Do family meetings for hospitalised palliative care patients improve outcomes and reduce health care costs? A cluster randomised trial

Background: Family meetings facilitate the exploration of issues and goals of care however, there has been minimal research to determine the benefits and cost implications.; Aims: To determine: (1) if family caregivers of hospitalised patients referred to palliative care who receive a structured family meeting report lower psychological distress (primary outcome), fewer unmet needs, improved quality of life; feel more prepared for the caregiving role; and receive better quality of end-of-life care; (2) if outcomes vary dependant upon site of care and; (3) t

Fri, 07/23/2021 - 16:03

Quality of Life and Well-being of Carers of People With Dementia: Are There Differences Between Working and Nonworking Carers? Results From the IDEAL Program

The aim of this study was to identify the differences in quality of life (QoL) and well-being between working and nonworking dementia carers and the relative contribution of psychological characteristics, caregiving experience, and social support. Multiple regressions modeled the contribution of working status, caregiver experiences, and psychological and social resources to carer QoL (EQ-5D) and well-being (WHO-5). After controlling for age, gender, carer–dyad relationship, and severity of dementia, working status contributed significant variance to EQ-5D (2%) but not to WHO-5 scores.

Fri, 07/23/2021 - 15:11

Effective interventions for depressive symptoms among caregivers of people with dementia: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Background Caring for a family member with dementia puts caregivers at risk for depressive symptoms. Yet, interventions with promising effects on caregiver depressive symptoms are not well documented. Aims This review aimed to examine the quality and effectiveness of interventions to reduce depressive symptoms reported by caregivers of people with dementia. Design A systematic review and meta-analysis of nonpharmacological intervention trials was conducted.

Tue, 04/13/2021 - 14:24

Women's Caregiving Experience of Older Persons Living With Alzheimer Disease and Related Dementias and Multiple Chronic Conditions: Using Wuest's Theory

Introduction Care of persons living with chronic conditions rests heavily on women within the context of the family. Research demonstrates that women experience more caregiving strain compared to men, yet less is known about the differences in experiences between women carers: namely, wives and daughters. Objective The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the experiences of wife and daughter carers of older adults living with Alzheimer disease and related dementias, plus at least two other chronic conditions.

Tue, 04/13/2021 - 13:53

Reasons for nonparticipation in the Valuing Active Life in Dementia randomised controlled trial of a dyadic occupational therapy intervention: An interview study

Objectives: There is currently little known about why people decline to participate in dyadic, psychosocial dementia research. This interview study aims to explore the reasons why people declined to participate in the Valuing Active Life in Dementia research trial. Methods: Ten family carers of people with dementia, who were part of a dyad that had declined to take part in the randomised controlled trial, participated in qualitative telephone interviews to explore their reasons for declining. Inductive thematic analysis was used to identify themes.

Wed, 04/07/2021 - 14:22

Racial Differences in Respite Use among Black and White Caregivers for People Living with Dementia

Objectives: To examine racial differences in respite utilization among a nationally representative sample of caregivers for persons living with dementia (PLwD). A secondary aim identified factors associated with respite utilization. Methods: Using data from the 2015 National Health and Aging Trends Study and National Study of Caregiving, we conducted binary logistic regression to examine racial difference in respite use among Black and white caregivers (n = 750). Results: 22% of the sample used respite for PLwD.

Tue, 04/06/2021 - 18:32

Quality of Life and Needs of Deaf Informal Caregivers of Loved Ones with Alzheimer's and Related Dementia

No studies have included the experiences and needs of informal caregivers who are deaf, use American Sign Language (ASL), and care for a loved one with Alzheimer's disease or related dementias (ADRD). The CDC's BRFSS Caregiver Module and PROMIS-Deaf Profile measures were administered via an online bilingual English/ASL platform between October 2019 and March 2020. Out of 194 deaf adult signers who completed an online survey, 42 respondents (mean age = 66; SD = 12; 74% White) endorsed informally caring for someone with a medical condition.

Tue, 04/06/2021 - 18:13

A qualitative study of family caregivers' coping strategies of looking after people with dementia in China

Background and aims: Globally, two thirds of people with dementia are cared for by their families or friends. Family caregivers' coping strategies of managing the caregiving burden of dementia have been studied widely in western literature. However, few attempts have been made to explore the experience of family caregivers' coping strategies in China. The aim of this study was to explore the family caregivers' coping strategies when caring for people with dementia in one city in the province of Shandong, China.

Tue, 04/06/2021 - 18:09

Missing the Mark: The Complexity of African American Dementia Family Caregiving

Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRDs) have a significant impact on families. Family nurses are in an ideal position to address the needs of families affected by ADRD. However, to be most effective, family nurses and researchers need culturally appropriate theories to guide practice and research. On November 17, 2018, five nurse researchers presented findings of their research with African American families at the Gerontological Society of America's annual meeting.

Tue, 04/06/2021 - 10:29

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