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Miscellaneous

Paying family caregivers: evaluating different models

This chapter provides an overview of different models of financial support for informal carers (that is, the kin and close friends) of older people. These models reflect the institutional and cultural traditions of the broader societies and welfare states of which they are a part. The chapter first argues that the issue of paying informal carers needs to be understood from several different policy perspectives. It then outlines four models of providing financial support for informal care, illustrated with examples from specific countries.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Review of respite services and short-term breaks for carers of people with dementia

The study aimed to establish the current state of knowledge about the effectiveness and cost- effectiveness of respite services and short breaks for carers for people with dementia.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Work Productivity and Health of Informal Caregivers of Persons With Advanced Cancer

The purpose of this study was to describe health promotion behaviors and work productivity loss in informal caregivers of individuals with advanced stage cancer. Using a cross-sectional, correlational design, 70 caregivers completed measures of health behaviors, mood, social support, and burden. Absenteeism and presenteeism were evaluated in employed caregivers (n = 40). Caregivers reported low levels of physical activity. The mean percentage of work productivity loss due to caregiving was 22.9%.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Caring, Employment, and Quality of Life: Comparison of Employed and Nonemployed Mothers of Adults with Intellectual Disability

The effects of caregiving on mothers of adults with intellectual disability was examined by determining whether there are differences in quality of life and related factors between mothers with different employment status. Study participants were 302 working-age mothers who had adult children with intellectual disability based on the 2008 census survey on intellectual disability carried out in Hsinchu, City, Taiwan.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

The ties that bind us: how existing relationships, health and gender shape family care in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) changes family roles and relationship dynamics and the experience of the disease is influenced by family functioning. Merleau- Ponty’s existential philosophy of the body provided the framework for this Heideggerian phenomenological inquiry. Fifteen people with COPD and 14 family members engaged in 58 semi-structured interviews either face-to-face or by telephone. This study identified a difference in the essence of the lived experiences between male and female carers, and between spousal and non-spousal carers in relation to severe COPD.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Burden and quality of life in caregivers of persons with multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the second most common cause of disability among nervous system diseases. This disease causes reduced quality of life of patients and those caring for them. Quality of life (QoL) measures consist of at least three broad domains: physical, mental and social. In the field of medicine, researchers have often used the concept of health-related quality of life, which specifically focuses on the impact of an illness and/or treatment on patients’ perception of their status of health and on subjective well-being or satisfaction with life.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Correlates of Caregiving Burden in Schizophrenia: A Cross-sectional, Comparative Analysis from India

Schizophrenia is a global mental health issue that has serious implications not only for the person with the diagnosis, but for caregivers as well. In Asian societies, the family tends to be the “natural” caregiver in such situations and the caregiving function is usually shouldered by parents or the spouse. Asian communities tend to be more closely knit, and it would be expected that more social support would be available to those facing distressing circumstances such as managing the demands of a person with mental illness.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

When is a carer's employment at risk? Longitudinal analysis of unpaid care and employment in midlife in England

This article examines the thresholds at which provision of unpaid care affects employment in England. Previous research has shown that providing care for 20 or more hours a week has a negative effect on employment. The present article explores the impact of a lower threshold and asks whether provision of care for 10 or more hours a week has a negative effect on employment. The article focuses on women and men aged between 50 and State Pension Age (60 for women, 65 for men).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

What makes Santander a great place to work; Bank delivers wide range of benefits for all

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to describe the policies and practices that have helped to make Santander UK a great place to work.

Design/methodology/approach – Explains the reasons for the policies, the form they take and the results they have achieved.

Findings – Details specific policies in areas such as work‐life balance, caring for carers, diversity, employee development, employee health, employees with school‐age children, employee engagement and community involvement. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Caring for a young adult with cancer: the impact on mothers’ health

That the carers of people with cancer are profoundly affected by their caring role is well established, yet the needs of one particular cohort, i.e. the parents of young adults with cancer, have not been well understood. The majority of carers in this situation are mothers, and it is the impact of the emotional and physical labour entailed by the care of young adults that is the focus of the present paper.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

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