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Family caregiver self-identification: implications for healthcare and social services professionals

This article focuses on a phenomenon that health and social service professionals face: Many family caregivers do not self-identify. The consequences of this lack of self-definition and the implications for development of programs that serve caregivers are discussed. The Mount Sinai Medical Center Caregivers and Professionals Partnership is described as an example of a hospital-based program that has recognized this dilemma and worked toward reaching out to those who do self-define, as well as those who may not.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

Remember the body: promoting physical health in dementia care

This article outlines the benefits and challenges associated with health promotion for people with dementia and their carers. It then provides an overview of the Manchester Supporting Health Dementia Programme (MSHDP) pilot, which ran from November 2009 to March 2012. The programme provided a health check service and also aimed to improve the availability of access to health improvement opportunities. A summary of the main outcomes from the independent evaluation are provided.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

Partners in care? Views and experiences of carers from a cohort study of the early implementation of the Mental Health (Care & Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003

Carers are seen as legitimate stakeholders in wider policy processes and increasingly as ‘co-producers’ and key providers of care. Mental health carers, however, especially those caring for relatives subject to compulsory care and treatment, often feel overlooked and marginalised, caring in complex circumstances with little or no professional support. The Mental Health (Care & Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003 (MHCT Act) implemented in 2005 aspired to change this for the better.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

Service barriers of Chinese family caregivers in Canada

Family caregiving is a stressful process, especially when the complexity of being an immigrant or ethnic minority is added. This paper examined service barriers experienced by Chinese immigrant family caregivers in Canada and the predictors of different types of barriers. Principle component analysis was performed with the barriers reported loading onto cultural barriers, administrative problems, circumstantial challenges, perceived negative quality of services, and personal attitudes.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

Choice of where and how you live: how families can create new solutions to a familiar problem

The White Paper Valuing People said the aim for people with learning disability should be choice of where and how you live. This is rarely the experience to date. A publication has been written for family carers, social workers and others who want to find out more about the various housing and support options for people with learning disabilities. It explains the choices, how to go about getting housing and what support people can find. Six individuals and their families allowed us to describe their different ways of creating housing and support arrangements.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Rural dementia carers: formal and informal sources of support

Primary carers provide much of the day-to-day care for community-dwelling people living with dementia (PWD). Maintaining that contribution will require a more in-depth understanding of the primary carer role and the support needs that flow from that role. This study explored patterns of formal and informal support utilisation by people caring for a PWD in a rural-regional context. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 rural primary carers of a PWD and thematically analysed.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Improving access to social care for adults with autism

This online guide looks at how social care services can improve access to adults with autism. It is based on research that explores the barriers to services experienced by people with autism. It covers people with autism, whether or not they also have a learning disability. The main sections of the guide cover: awareness raising; acceptability and accessibility; joint working; transitions; early intervention and prevention; personalising services; and carers. The guide suggests ways services can improve, identifying how best to meet the goals of the government's autism strategy.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

It's everybody's business: care and support for the 21st century

The Right Care, Right Deal coalition combines three of the UK's largest charities working with older people, their families and carers (Counsel and Care, Carers UK and Help the Aged) to urge the Government to renew its vision for the future of social care in England. (See Related Link for the consultation document: The case for change: why England needs a new care and support system, 2008). This campaign document outlines the main issues needed to be tackled in order for there to be 'a new, personalised and better funded deal for social care, fit for the 21st Century'.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Support to family carers of patients with frontotemporal dementia

OBJECTIVES: To examine the provision of support to patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and their family carers compared with patients with early onset Alzheimer's dementia (AD) and their carers, and the carers' satisfaction with the support. METHOD: Data came from 60 dyads of patients with dementia and their principal family carers, 23 subjects with frontotemporal dementia and their 23 carers, and 37 subjects with early onset Alzheimer's disease and their 37 carers. RESULTS: Patients with a frontotemporal dementia diagnosis were significantly more frequently offered stays in nursing

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Reaching out or missing out : approaches to outreach with family carers in social care organisations

Outreach is advocated as a way of improving the uptake of services among underserved populations and of filling the gaps between mainstream services and the populations they are intended to support. Despite the policy emphasis on providing better help for family carers, research consistently shows that many of those providing unpaid care to a family member or friend report difficulties in finding out about the assistance to which they are entitled.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17