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Active ageing among older adults with lifelong intellectual disabilities: the role of familial and nonfamilial social networks

Little research has examined the extent to which active ageing is facilitated by family and nonfamilial support persons of older adults with intellectual disabilities. This study explores the role played by key unpaid carers/support persons of older adults with lifelong intellectual disabilities in facilitating “active ageing.” All key social network members conceived active ageing to mean ongoing activity.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Who will care? Meeting the care deficit

As the population continues to age, more of us are becoming carers, and many just juggle responsibilities between working and caring. Innovative policy reform is fundamental if we are to meet future demand for care, explains Dalia Ben-Galim. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Dementia risk reduction: it's never too early, it's never too late

There are 850,000 people living with dementia in the United Kingdom today, and there is currently no diseasemodifying intervention available for any form of the condition. Costs from dementia to the UK economy are currently estimated to be over L24 billion a year and approximately 700,000 people are informal carers for people who have dementia. While age is the biggest risk factor for developing dementia, the condition is not an inevitable part of ageing. Other factors such as medical history, lifestyle and genetics may also contribute to the risk of developing dementia.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Growing older with learning disabilities: the GOLD programme

This paper provides an overview of the GOLD programme at the Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities. It describes the work of the 13 funded projects in a context of wider research concerning ageing and learning disabilities. Particular attention is given to those people living with older family carers and those living in residential services for older people. The picture is of services that offer little confidence for the future, as people with learning disabilities grow older.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Ageing and people with learning disabilities: in search of evidence

Background: Growing numbers of people with learning disabilities are now living into older age. This study aims to examine the state of knowledge about their lives and the challenges that ageing has for both family carers and policymakers and practitioners.

Materials and Methods: The article synthesises existing research in the fields of learning disability, ageing and family and social care with a view to learning lessons from these separate fields, identifying possibilities for collaboration and identifying gaps in knowledge.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Caring for a child with learning disabilities: over a prolonged period of time: an exploratory survey on the experiences and health of older parent carers living in Scotland

BACKGROUND: The negative health impacts of prolonged caregiving are widely reported. However, there is a paucity of evidence concerning the impacts of a lifetime of caring on older parents of offspring with learning disabilities.

DESIGN AND METHODS: An exploratory postal survey including the Medical Outcome Study (Short Form) 36 version 2 (SF-36v2) was completed by 100 older parent carers. The reported survey is part of a larger mixed method study including in-depth interviews.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

PL01 The impact of caring for spouses on mental health and health behaviours in over 50s in Ireland, the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing

Background An association between informal caring and increased stress, depression and ill-health has been found previously. Limited data are available on the effect of spousal caring on mental health. This study aimed to determine if informal caring for a spouse was associated with depression or health behaviours in adults aged over 50 in Ireland and whether these effects were influenced by the amount of formal care also received.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

The internet as social support for older carers of adults with intellectual disabilities

Social support is a potentially powerful mediator of well-being for family carers. Given that social engagement often decreases with age, the Internet broadens the opportunities for aging carers of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) to provide support to one another. This article reviews what constitutes social support, its importance to older adults, and more specifically carers of those with I/DD. Computer and Internet usage by older adults is briefly reviewed.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

The impact of being the intermediate caring generation and intergenerational transfers on self-reported health of women in Ireland

Objectives: To investigate the associations with being the “sandwich generation” in older women in Ireland and its impact on self-reported health.

Methods: Analysis of 3,196 women from wave 1 of the Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) was undertaken. Poisson regression was used to determine whether intergenerational transfers, were associated with self-rated physical health and depression, when controlling for other socio-demographic variables.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Workplace practices for retaining older hospital nurses: implications from a study of nurses with eldercare responsibilities

Attempts to address the nursing shortage must consider the aging nursing supply and the decreased labour participation among nurses at age 55 and older. Efforts to retain older, experienced nurses have been meagre, and little attention is paid to the role of eldercare in decisions to leave the profession. This pilot study examines current workplace practices that may contribute to early withdrawal of older nurses from the hospital workforce. Interviews with 28 elder caregiving registered nurses and assistive nursing personnel at a New York hospital were conducted.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11