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A systematic review of informal caregivers' needs in providing home-based end-of-life care to people with cancer

Aims.  This paper presents the results of a systematic review examining the practical information needs of informal caregivers providing home-based palliative and end-of-life care to people with advanced cancer.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Young Carers in Canada: An Invisible Population

The article provides an overview on what is known about young carers in general and identify in and services in Canada. Young carers are defined as being anyone under the age of 18 years who is the primary caregiver in the family due to the parental illness, disability or addiction. It discusses the potential short and long term consequences of having to take on a care giving role within one's family that is age appropriately greater than one would expect in most families.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

The effectiveness of an Internet support forum for carers of people with dementia: a pre-post cohort study

Background: The well-being of informal carers of people with dementia is an important public health issue. Caring for an elderly relative with dementia may be burdensome and stressful, and can negatively affect the carer’s social, family, and professional life. The combination of loss, the physical demands of caregiving, prolonged distress, and biological vulnerabilities of older carers may compromise their physical health, increase social isolation, and increase the risk of anxiety and depressive disorders.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Carrying the Weight

The author reflects on her work at a child and youth care worker program in Algonquin, Ontario. She relates the stories of families that arrive at the shelter, as well as the sacrifices of young carers in these families. According to the author, her work at the shelter provided an opportunity to observe family functioning. She emphasizes that the goal of providing support and service to the family is to ease the responsibility or burden of the young caregiver.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

New study finds a million young carers

Reports on the increase in the number of young people who care for other individuals with disability, illness, or health problem in Great Britain, according to a study commissioned by the Princess Royal Trust for Carers. Number of people who carried out a caring role based on a 2001 census; Concerns on the caregivers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Informal and formal caregivers' involvement in nursing home care activities: impact of integrated care

Aims.  This paper reports a study to investigate the relationships between informal and formal care, changing relationships over time, impact of integrated care, and theoretical and methodological lessons that can be drawn from research on this topic.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

'So that's how I found out I was a young carer and that I actually had been a carer most of my life'. Identifying and supporting hidden young carers

A common theme in the literature on care-giving is the issue of ‘hidden’ carers, that is, people who undertake caring roles and responsibilities, yet do not identify themselves as carers. One reason people do not recognise themselves as carers relates to the nature of the caring relationship. When providing care for a family member, intra-familial bonds of love and reciprocity do not encourage parties to view the relationship as anything other than a ‘normal’ familial relationship.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Research into Practice

Focuses on a research on older people who combine the caring role with paid employment. Stages of data collection used in the study; Findings of the research concerning employment policies; Reasons behind the decrease in the number of informal carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Older carers in the UK: who cares?

Long-term care in the UK relies heavily on informal and unpaid carers. Statistical data regarding the number of carers in the 2001 Census compared with the 2011 Census identify an increase of around 600 000 carers. It is also significant that many of these carers are themselves in their late middle age. The reasons for taking on the caring role are varied, but there are significant potential physical, mental and financial issues associated with taking on the caring role. Positive benefits in terms of support provision for the carer do exist, but support services across the UK are variable.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Happy and excited despite heavy caring commitment

This article focuses on a 2007 survey by "Community Care" which found that almost half of young carers will spend a number of hours caring for another member of their family on Christmas Day. Forty-six per cent of young carers have not talked to a social worker in the last year about the support they need, according to the survey of 109 young carers aged eight-16 in Great Britain. The survey also revealed reluctance among young carers to want more professional support.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09