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Keeping carers healthy: the role of community nurses and colleagues

Carers form a substantial proportion of the patients seen by primary care professionals, but their health needs are often overlooked. By recognizing and addressing the needs of the carer as well as the patient, primary care staff (including practice, community and district nurses) can protect the physical and mental health of both. Staff can start by developing simple systems for identifying and recording both patients who are carers, and patients who have carers. Primary health professionals may be able to identify specific opportunities for checking on carers’ health, e.g.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Children caring for their “caregivers”: exploring the caring arrangements in households affected by AIDS in Western Kenya

Reflecting dominant understandings of childhood, many researchers describe orphans as an emotional and financial cost to the households in which they live. This has created a representation of orphans as a burden, not only to their fostering household, but also to society. This article seeks to challenge this representation by exploring children's contributions to their fostering households.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

The eCare Client Impact Survey (eCCIS) - Developing a new Tool for assessing Client Impacts of Telehealthcare

Telehealthcare is an increasingly popular option for health and social care organisations providing care to people in their own homes, principally providing the means to improve both the quality and efficiency of care services. However, the evidence-base for the impacts of telehealthcare in terms of general quality of life , well-being and satisfaction for older people and informal carers remains patchy. We argue that the impacts of telehealthcare lie in certain specific areas not sufficiently covered by existing measures.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

The Princess Royal Trust for Carers in association with Young Carers International Research and Evaluation

The article presents a study that examined the experiences, needs and service responses to the 290,000 young adult caregivers aged 16-24 in Great Britain today. It says that the research included a literature review, secondary analysis of 2001 Census data, a survey of 25 young caregivers projects, a survey of 13 adult carers services, focus groups with 29 young caregivers aged 16 and 17, discussions with staff at focus group sites, and in-depth interviews with 25 young adult caregivers aged 18-24 across the country.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

The New Caring

Increasing longevity and the growing proportion of the aged in the population in most countries have served to focus on the question of how governments and older people can finance living, health, and care options in retirement. Prudent management of income and assets is an increasingly complex and important aspect of aging as assets and expectations of self-financing increase. Although many informal caregivers act as asset managers and/or substitute decision-makers for older people, little attention has been paid to this increasingly important aspect of care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

From Assistance to Prevention: Categorizing Young Carer Support Services in Australia, and International Implications

Young people who provide unpaid care for a relative with chronic illness or disability are a growing focus of public policy and research in Australia and internationally. Support services for these young carers have emerged, but not enough is known about their effectiveness. This article develops an analytical framework that categorizes young carer support services according to their goals and the types of intervention provided. The analytical framework is based on Australian data.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

The ATHENE Project: The importance of bricolage in personalising assisted living technologies

Introduction: An aging population is fueling interest in assisted living technologies (ALTs) to support independence at home. Numerous ALTs have been developed and deployed, but uptake and use has fallen short of levels predicted by policymakers. A key reason is a lack of understanding of users’ needs. In this paper we report findings from the ATHENE (Assistive Technologies for Healthy Living in Elders: Needs Assessment by Ethnography) project, which is funded by the Technology Strategy Board under its Assisted Living Innovation Platform programme.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:14

Carers and the digital divide: factors affecting Internet use among carers in the UK

This paper presents data from a cross-sectional survey of 3014 adult carers, examining use of the Internet and factors associated with it. Carers recruited from the databases of three local authorities and other carer organisations within their geographical boundaries and that of Carers UK, a national carers organisation, were sent a postal questionnaire (response rate: 40%).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

The role of the primary care team in support of informal carers

Caring for an elderly, frail or disabled person has effects on physical and psychological health as well as financial and social consequences. There are 6 million informal carers in the UK and the primary care team together with other community services is expected to provide the support they need. However, most primary care team members feel ill equipped to do so and there is very little evidence about which interventions are effective.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Place of death: preferences among cancer patients and their carers

The place of death of cancer patients has become an important theme in UK cancer and palliative care policy. This paper examines the place of death preferences of 41 terminally ill cancer patients and 18 of their informal carers, living in the Morecambe Bay area of north-west England. We interviewed cancer patients referred to the research team by 13 specialist palliative care professionals; patients had an estimated 3 months of life remaining.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12