Skip to content

Toggle service links

You are here

  1. Home
  2. Medical care

Medical care

Asian carers' experiences of medical and social care: the case of cerebral palsy

This paper discusses the experience of South Asian carers of a person with cerebral palsy. Previous research in this area has failed to explore carers' perceptions of causation or their views on the quality of service support. Qualitative interviews were carried out with twenty carers in two localities in the north of England with the aim of providing in‐depth contextualized data on their experiences over time, their attitudes towards cerebral palsy and their interactions with service provision.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:21

Good practice in European integration: Lessons from the AIDA Project

Introduction: Interest in the integration of health and social care services has grown in recent years amongst all Governments in Europe in light of the increasing numbers of older people and those affected by chronic illnesses. This poster offers a review of the “Album of 10 Good Practices of integration at European level” carried out within the Advancing Integration for a Dignified Ageing (AIDA)- Project (www.projectaida.eu/). This was funded by EU Progress Program with the purpose of highlighting common aspects of effectiveness.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:21

'It terrifies me, the thought of the future': listening to the current concerns of informal carers of people with a learning disability

The aim of this article is to report findings from a study that asked carers for their views on a wide range of topics. Issues relevant to the current concerns of carers are reported here. A mixed method triangulated design yielded both quantitative and qualitative data. A total of 647 members of a parent/carer federation were sent a questionnaire with a section on ‘current concerns’. The response rate was 23 percent (151 participants). Two focus groups were held with 15 carers who had completed the questionnaire.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

The social consequences of living with and dealing with incontinence—A carers perspective

Incontinence is a discrediting and stigmatising condition for those who experience it, as it signifies a person who is lacking in self-control. For their carers, the very nature of undertaking ‘dirty work’ signifies a low status and low paid job. Those health care professionals higher in status and financial reward put distance between themselves and bodywork, especially bodywork that deals with bodily decay. However, little is known or has been highlighted about the social consequences that living with and dealing with incontinence can have on informal carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:20

Development of a position document for home care - wound care

Introduction and description of care: The management of non-healing wounds in Europe has gone through a dramatic shift in the location of service delivery from hospital towards home care settings. As a consequence more wounds with complex pathological pictures due to untreated patient co-morbidities are treated at home.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Confronting the care penalty: the case for extending reasonable adjustment rights along the disability/care continuum

Informal caring for adults with disabilities is a source of unacceptable disadvantage in employment, finances, social inclusion, and health; here termed the ‘care penalty’. This penalty can be appropriately tackled through equality law, making care a ground for unlawful discrimination. Carers are not adequately protected from indirectly discriminatory disadvantages by other grounds such as sex and disability. Nor are carers adequately protected by carer-specific provisions such as the UK right to request flexible working.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Who cares? – caring for the carers of stroke patients

The author reflects on the employment of informal carers to assist stroke patients in England and Wales in recovering from severe disability. He cites that the National Service Framework for Older People emphasizes the importance of care for stroke patients to be able to live at home. The employment of informal carers was questioned during the National Sentinel Audit for Stroke due to some factors that affect the quality of services and the life of the care taker.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

PEACEanywhere - Implementing the vision for integrated health and social care

Introduction: The ultimate Vision for Assisted Living is the provision of integrated health and social care, thus allowing health and social care professionals and carers to work in harmony to maximise the people's quality of life. PEACEanywhere one of the Projects under the auspices of the Technology Strategy Board Assisted Living Innovation Platform (ALIP2) sought to progress the vision towards implementation.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Chapter 2: THE SUPPORT OF CARERS AND THEIR ORGANIZATIONS IN SOME NORTHERN AND WESTERN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES

Chapter 2 of the book "Key Policy Issues in Long-Term Care" is presented. It explores the support of carers and the carers' organizations in certain countries in northern and western Europe. It looks into the carers' support that is given in the said countries and views the development of the new policy initiatives carers in the Netherlands. It is stated that carers' organization plays an important role in the formation of carers' policy.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Informal carers’ experience of caring for stroke survivors

Background.  Stroke is the third most common cause of death in industrialized countries and a major cause of adult disability. However, the burden of caring for stroke survivors usually rests with family members who have neither chosen nor volunteered for the role of ‘carer’.

Aims.  This paper reports on a study which aimed to describe the experience of caring for a stroke survivor at one year after stroke in Scotland.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17