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Medical care

Using technology to support people at risk of falling

In 2012 it was estimated 800 people fell daily in the West Midlands and fall detectors were an under-used resource. A fall detector does not prevent a fall but sends an alert so that someone knows a person has fallen making a difference to living independently by restoring confidence. There is a direct correlation between recovery and how long people lie on the floor after a fall; the speedier the response, the lower the risk of hospital admission and the shorter the length of hospital stay and subsequent support requirements on discharge.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Future of social media in health and care with co-production

Future of health in EU faces the triple challenges of ageing, fiscal restriction and inclusion. In the UK the number of aged people will increase to 6.6 million in the next 25 years. In Scotland, the group people 74+ are projected to increase most dramatically by 82% by 2035. That statistics show every day the needs of older people are growing and an increasing number of carers are required. Now the number of carers are around 10% of population of the UK. In next 25 years the population of carers will rise to 9 million.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

People into Employment: supporting people with disabilities and carers into work

Carers and people with disabilities are two disadvantaged groups at risk of social exclusion. Work is an important route to social inclusion, but carers and people with disabilities are under-represented in the work force. The present paper reports key findings from a new study that evaluated People into Employment (PIE), a pilot employment project in the north-east of England designed to support people with disabilities, carers and former carers in gaining mainstream work.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Everyday experiences of parents with disabled children

The family is a space for learning that is in constant renewal and enrichment. However, when one of its members has a disability, the family plays a major role in the daily reconstruction of the intimate and social life of its members. And as ageing is inevitable, parents are constantly worried about who will take care of their children. Children become increasingly more dependent as parents face physical limitations in caring for their children.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Informal care, health and mortality

Informal care provision is an activity in which individuals are increasingly likely to become involved across their life course, and particularly in later life, as a result of demographic changes such as increasing longevity and changes in co-residential living arrangements in later life. Academic research so far has highlighted the adverse impact of informal care provision on the financial position of the carer, however, the evidence on the impact of informal care provision on the carer's physical, mental and emotional health, and on their mortality, presents a more complex picture.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

What do informal carers need from district nursing services? (Cover story)

More than 5 million informal carers provide support to individuals who wish to remain within their own homes. The role of informal carers in maintaining people within their own homes has been identified as crucial. This article considers the assessment of need of informal carers in the primary care setting, placing particular emphasis on the role of the district nurse as an advocate for informal carers when working with other health and social care service providers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Development of an integrated external and internal location system with activity monitoring

Although the potential of using location information to support people with dementia has been recognised, the uptake of location technology in this area has been limited compared with the uptake of standard Telecare techniques. The paper examines the reasons for this and describes a project, EASE (Extended Active Support Environment) which was commissioned by NHS South as part of their SBRI for Dementia programme, to develop a system which would address these issues and make location technologies a practical tool to support people with more advanced dementia. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

The opportunity costs of informal care: does gender matter?

In this paper, we investigate the costs borne by both male and female carers in terms of their forgone formal employment opportunities. Traditionally, informal care was supplied by women but nowadays women are not only more likely to work, but also likely to be significant contributors to family finances. For women, this implies that the size of any forgone earnings cost of informal care is increasing. At the same time, population ageing is making for increasing numbers requiring care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:10

Informal in-hospital care in a rehabilitation setting in Greece: An estimation of the nursing staff required for substituting this care

Purpose. To explore: (a) the type and frequency of care-giving activities provided by family members in the Rehabilitation Setting (RS), (b) opportunities for family members to receive training in care-giving activities, (c) to what extent caregivers feel free to ask the nursing staff for help and (d) to estimate the number of nursing staff required to substitute this care and thus to estimate the money saved by the RS due to the in-hospital informal care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Listening to carers' views on stroke services

Anne Marie Tunney and Assumpta Ryan discuss a study that used the experiences of women caring for survivors to assist service redesign

Aim  The aim of this study was to explore how members of a stroke carers’ support group perceived that services for stroke patients and their carers could be improved.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09