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Abuse of female caregiver by care recipients: another form of elder abuse

This article focuses on the abuse of ageing caregiving women (55 years or older) by the spouses or parents for whom they provide care. Data presented were derived from a study of the dynamics of family caregiving focusing on Mexican American and Anglo caregiving dyads. Analysis focused on identifying correlates of abuse from a group of variables that represented the structure and context of caregiving. Data suggests the problem is not trivial and the interactional context of caregiving is the most promising aspect for explanation, intervention, and prevention.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Does informal care from children to their elderly parents substitute for formal care in Europe

This paper analyzes the impact of informal care by adult children on the use of long-term care among the elderly in Europe and the effect of the level of the parent’s disability on this relationship. We focus on two types of formal home care that are the most likely to interact with informal care: paid domestic help and nursing care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Parents and partners: lay carers' perceptions of their role in the treatment and care of adults with cystic fibrosis

Background.  Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common autosomal recessive genetic disease in Caucasian people, traditionally conceptualized as a condition whereby sufferers died in childhood. However, the current median survival age of 30 and a predicted median survival age of 40 for those born with the disease over the last decade ensure that families members will assist hospital staff with treatment and care well into most patients' adulthood.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Caregiving for Parents and In-Laws: Commonalities and Differences

This study examined support, stress, and well-being between adults who provide care for an aging and disabled parent and those who care for an aging and disabled parent-in-law. The study utilized a sample of individuals caring for a parent (n = 77), individuals caring for an in-law (n = 26) and a comparison group of noncaregivers (n = 1,939) from the Midlife Development in the United States study. In-law caregivers provided more financial assistance but adult child caregivers provided more emotional support and unpaid work.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Current and future concerns of older parents of sons and daughters with intellectual disabilities

Increasingly greater numbers of older parents are providing care at home for their sons and daughters with intellectual disabilities. As attention needs to be paid to the supports needed by such families to assist them with their caregiving activities, it is prudent to identify the types of supports that will be needed when the parents are no longer able to provide care. Working with a cohort of older parent carers in Prince Edward Island, Canada, the authors undertook to examine older carer concerns and planning issues.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Financial well-being of US parents caring for coresident children and adults with developmental disabilities: An age cohort analysis*

Background Understanding how financial well-being changes through the life course of caregiving parents of children with developmental disabilities is critically important. Methods We analyse SIPP (U.S. Census Bureau) data to describe income poverty, asset poverty, income, net worth, and liquid assets of US parents ( N = 753) of children with developmental disabilities. Results Income and asset poverty was greatest for the youngest and oldest parents.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

Futures planning for people with learning disabilities living with older family carers

People with learning disabilities are increasingly outliving their parents. To avoid traumatic and inappropriate transitions from the family home in later life, services need to improve their relationships with families. Practical examples are given of how families are being supported to face the future. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

How caring for a parent affects the psychosocial development of the young

Aim To investigate the impact of caring for a parent on the psychosocial development of the young person. Methods A total of 20 young carers and 20 non-caregiving peers, aged 11-18 years, were compared on self-report measures of life satisfaction, self-esteem, and behavioural strengths and difficulties. Parental reports on their child's behaviour were obtained and measured. Results Young carers reported lower life satisfaction and self-esteem compared with non-caregiving peers, and their parents rated them as having more difficulties with peer relationships and more emotional symptoms.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Children who care for parents with mental health problems

A significant number of children and young people are caring for a parent or parents with mental health problems defined as serious or severe, and enduring. Children and young people with these responsibilities are often referred to as young carers. It is important that they are recognised as children and young people in the first instance, then as carers. And what helps these young people most is the support that is provided to their parents. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15

Where carers become the cared for

Carers with learning disabilities are a hidden group within the population, and remain a largely neglected group. The article describes a campaign called ‘Who Cares for Us?' which is working with government and social services to make sure carers with learning disabilities are included in the new carers strategies. The Valuing People Now formed a National Network for Carers with Learning Disabilities, building on the work of 'Who Cares for Us'.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:15