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Qualitative

Informal carers' experiences of caring for someone with Multiple Sclerosis: A photovoice investigation

Objectives: This study explores the lived experiences of carers of people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), specifically in relation to their quality of life (QoL), through the use of images and narratives, with the aim of gaining a nuanced insight into the complex nature of QoL in the MS caregiving context.; Design: Real-time qualitative design using the photovoice method.; Methods: Twelve MS carers (aged 30-73 years) took photographs of objects/places/events that represented enhancement or compromise to their QoL and composed written narrativ

Fri, 07/23/2021 - 16:37

Experiences of family caregivers of patients with terminal disease and the quality of end-of-life care received: a mixed methods study

The aim of this study was to analyze the perceptions and experiences of relatives of patients dying from a terminal disease with regard to the care they received during the dying process, considering the oncological or non-oncological nature of the terminal disease, and the place where care was provided (at home, emergency department, hospital room, or palliative care unit).

Mon, 03/22/2021 - 11:16

Stroke patients' and informal carers' experiences with life after stroke: an overview of qualitative systematic reviews

Purpose To provide a systematic overview of current qualitative systematic reviews and metasyntheses of patients' and informal carers' experiences with rehabilitation and life after stroke following discharge. Method A systematic literature search was performed based on PRISMA guidelines. Nine databases were systematically searched by a university librarian. The search yielded 1093 unique entries and screening by title/abstract identified 60 reviews for potential inclusion.

Mon, 03/08/2021 - 13:57

The Life Experiences Among Primary Family Caregivers of Home-Based Palliative Care

Background: An increasing number of patients with terminal illnesses prefer to die in their own homes due to aging, high medical payments, a limited number of hospitalization days, and the ability to receive care from family members.

Fri, 12/11/2020 - 16:42

"It's Like a Death Sentence but It Really Isn't" What Patients and Families Want to Know About Hospice Care When Making End-of-Life Decisions

Background: Hospice is underutilized, due to both lack of initiation from patients and late referral from clinicians. Prior research has suggested the reasons for underuse are multifactorial, including clinician and patient lack of understanding, misperceptions about the nature of hospice care, and poor communication during end-of-life discussions about hospice care. Little is known about the decisional needs of patients and families engaging in hospice decision-making.

Fri, 12/11/2020 - 14:00

Impact of Memory Problems Post-stroke on Patients and Their Family Carers: A Qualitative Study

Background: Memory problems post-stroke are common and for some, these problems could then progress to a dementia illness. Once in the community, stroke-survivors are looked after by their family doctors although there is evidence that these patients may struggle to access appropriate help in the community for these problems. Although a stroke-survivor may be physically capable of performing daily tasks, they and their families may have to learn to manage and adapt to their new memory deficits.

Fri, 12/11/2020 - 10:27

How Can the Arts Influence the Attitudes of Dementia Caregivers? A Mixed-Methods Longitudinal Investigation

Background and Objectives Arts activities can improve social connectedness and foster reciprocity between people living with dementia and their caregivers. The extent to which the arts can help shape attitudes towards dementia remains unclear. This paper explores the impact of a 12-week visual arts program "Dementia and Imagination" on the attitudes of family and professional caregivers through a mixed-methods longitudinal investigation, underpinned by a conceptual framework of the arts in dementia care.

Thu, 12/10/2020 - 14:14

From the carer's mouth: A phenomenological exploration of carer experiences with head and neck cancer patients

Objective: Receiving a diagnosis of head and neck cancer is devastating for patients and family carers and causes high levels of distress. Previous studies report that carer distress levels exceed that of patients, but go largely unnoticed by health professionals. To date, there is a paucity of studies that have described carers' perspectives of the lived experience of caring for a loved one diagnosed with head and neck cancer. The aim of this study was to explore the lived experiences of carers of patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer.

Mon, 12/07/2020 - 15:27

Family Experiences Prior to the Initiation of Care for First-Episode Psychosis: A Meta-Synthesis of Qualitative Studies

Objectives: This study systematically reviewed existing qualitative evidence of family members' experiences prior to the initiation of mental health services for a loved one experiencing their first episode of psychosis (FEP). Methods: A meta-synthesis review of published peer-reviewed qualitative studies conducted between 2010 and 2019 were included. Keyword searches were performed in four electronic databases and the reference lists of primary manuscripts.

Wed, 12/02/2020 - 15:15

Developing Unique Insights From Narrative Responses to Bereaved Family Surveys

Context: Although bereaved family surveys (BFS) are routinely used quantitatively for quality assessment, open-ended and narrative responses are rarely systematically analyzed. Analysis of narrative responses may identify opportunities for improving end-of-life (EOL) care delivery. Objectives: To highlight the value of routine and systematic analysis of narrative responses and to thematically summarize narrative responses to the BFS of Veterans Affairs.

Thu, 11/26/2020 - 12:10

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