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Understanding and responding to the needs of the carers of people with dementia in the UK, the US and beyond

...this paper explores:

  • Insights into the role and experience of carers in different national contexts
  • Good practice examples of services, organisations and approaches which have sought to improve support to the carers of people with dementia
  • Policy and practice recommendations for key stakeholders such as policy makers, welfare services and employers

Given the traditional focus of Walgreens Boots in the US and the UK (and given very different policy contexts and welfare mixes), the review focuses on these two countries, with additional insights from other countries prominent in the literature and representing different welfare regimes. After searching the literature and following dialogue with UK and US respondents, this includes:

  • Norway (as an example of developments in a Scandinavian system with a comprehensive welfare state, an emphasis on maximising labour market participation and a commitment to gender equality)
  • Australia (as an example of an Australasian country with strong links to the UK)
  • South Africa (as an example of an African country with a younger population but a growing recognition of future needs as the population ages, as well as challenges with HIV-associated dementia)

Throughout the paper, there is an overarching question about the extent to which different countries are ready for the implications of the demographic changes they face, and there are regular textboxes which pose questions to government, to employers, to health and social care, and to broader society to help them reflect on key themes.

Original source (some source materials require subscription or permission to access)

Key Information

Type of Reference
Rprt
Type of Work
Review
Publisher
University of Birmingham School of Social Policy
Publication Year
2018