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Psychological Correlates of Burden Among Jordanian Caregivers of Patients With Serious Mental Illness

PURPOSE To examine prediction power of personality traits, expressed emotion, and coping strategies on caregivers' burden. DESIGNS AND METHODS Cross-sectional descriptive correlational design was used to collect data from 196 caregivers using the Self-Administered Questionnaire from Jordanian caregivers of patients with serious mental illness. FINDINGS Jordanian caregivers had a moderate-to-severe burden level (M = 47.1, SD = 11.5).

Tue, 05/14/2019 - 12:51

Addressing the support needs of families during the acute hospitalization of a parent with mental illness: A narrative literature review

Hospitalisation of a parent with acute mental health problems impacts the consumer, their extended family/carers and children. Mental health nurses are at the forefront of promoting recovery for consumers in an acute inpatient setting. Recovery-oriented care can include provision of family-focused care which supports recovery of the parent-consumer and their family members and contributes to prevention of intergenerational mental illness.

Tue, 05/14/2019 - 12:29

A “separation of worlds”: The support and social networks of family carers of people with dementia at the end of life, and the possible role of the internet

Caring for someone with dementia is one of the most challenging caring roles; however, the demands of the role towards the end of life often mean carers are unable to maintain face-to-face support. The aim of this study was to: (a) Explore the experiences of older (over 65 years) family carers of people with dementia of support towards the end of life; (b) Explore with family carers the role of the internet as a support for them at the end of life.

Tue, 05/14/2019 - 11:09

The impact of volunteering on the volunteer: findings from a peer support programme for family carers of people with dementia

With an ageing population, there are increasing numbers of experienced family carers (FCs) who could provide peer support to newer carers in a similar care situation. The aims of this paper are to: (i) use a cross-sectional study design to compare characteristics of volunteers and recipients of a peer support programme for FCs of people with dementia, in terms of demographic background, social networks and psychological well-being; and (ii) use a longitudinal study design to explore the overall impact of the programme on the volunteers in terms of psychological well-being.

Tue, 05/14/2019 - 10:28

Family caregivers as needed partners: recognizing their role in medicaid managed long‐term services and supports

Adults with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (IDD) in the United States are supported by both formal Medicaid‐funded long‐term services and supports and family caregivers. Lack of alternative housing options and wait lists for long‐term services and supports means the role of the family caregiver is and will continue be critical.

Sun, 05/05/2019 - 19:43

Caregiver burden in Alzheimer's disease: moderation effects of social support and mediation effects of positive aspects of caregiving

Objectives: Although there are many studies on the relationship between patient‐related factors and negative caregiver outcomes, the specifics of this relationship are poorly understood. Aim: to examine whether caregiver social support moderated the relationship between patient factors and negative outcomes for caregivers of community‐dwelling older adults with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and whether positive aspects of caregiving mediated this relationship.

Sun, 05/05/2019 - 19:14

Carers' involvement in decision making about antipsychotic medication: a qualitative study

Background: Current Australian mental health policy recommends that carers should be involved in the provision of mental health services. Carers often provide intensive support to mental health consumers and gain detailed insight into their lives. As such, carers could make valuable contributions to well-informed decisions about mental health consumers' use of antipsychotic medication. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore carers' participation in antipsychotic medication decision making.

Sat, 05/04/2019 - 12:37

Association of informal caregiver distress with health outcomes of community‐dwelling dementia care recipients: a systematic review

Background: Most dementia care occurs in the community with support from informal caregivers who are often distressed. Dementia caregiver distress is known to be hazardous to the caregiver's health, but the impact on the dementia care recipient is not well known. Methods: the Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases were searched from inception until June 2017 for studies investigating the association of informal caregiver distress with health outcomes of community‐dwelling dementia care recipients.

Sat, 05/04/2019 - 12:24

‘Replacement care’ for working carers? a longitudinal study in England, 2013–15

In the context of rising need for long‐term care, reconciling unpaid care and carers’ employment is becoming an important social issue. In England, there is increasing policy emphasis on paid services for the person cared for, sometimes known as ‘replacement care’, to support working carers. Previous research has found an association between ‘replacement care’ and carers’ employment. However, more information is needed on potential causal connections between services and carers’ employment.

Fri, 05/03/2019 - 17:08

Assessing care‐giving demands, resources and costs of family/friend caregivers for persons with mental health disorders: a scoping review

As mental health (MH) care has shifted from institutional settings to the community, families and friends are responsible for providing the majority of the care at home. The substantial literature on the adverse effects experienced by caregivers has focused mainly on psychological morbidity. Less attention has been paid to how caregivers for persons with MH disorders interact with larger social systems and the impacts of factors such as financial strain, lost time from leisure activities, and the availability of health and social services.

Tue, 04/16/2019 - 11:42

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