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Patterns of carer distress over time in mild dementia

Objective To study the level of carer reported distress in mild dementia, over a 3‐year period. Methods This study is part of the Norwegian DemVest‐study and utilises data from carers of people with mild dementia (n = 223). Those diagnosed with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB, n = 63) and Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 97) were included together with other dementia types (n = 63). The Relatives' Stress Scale was used to assess the level of reported distress in carers.

Fri, 04/05/2019 - 11:20

The impact of early psychosocial intervention on self‐efficacy of care recipient/carer dyads living with early‐stage dementia—A mixed‐methods study

Aim To evaluate the effect of a targeted community‐based psychosocial intervention on self‐efficacy outcomes for care recipient/carer dyads living with early‐stage dementia. Background There is increasing interest in the role of self‐efficacy and self‐management structures in determining positive outcomes for people with dementia. The assumption is that care recipient/carer dyads who receive early support to identify and adjust to dementia‐related changes will cope better in the long term.

Fri, 04/05/2019 - 10:59

Disciplinary power and the process of training informal carers on stroke units

This article examines the process of training informal carers on stroke units using the lens of power. Care is usually assumed as a kinship obligation but the state has long had an interest in framing the carer and caring work. Training carers in healthcare settings raises questions about the power of the state and healthcare professionals as its agents to shape expectations and practices related to the caring role.

Fri, 04/05/2019 - 09:33

An integrative review on family caregivers' involvement in care of home-dwelling elderly

Often family members provide care-giving, which allows older adults to remain in their homes. With declining health and increasing frailty, care-giving of elderly people becomes a task of family caregivers (FC) in conjunction with home care nurses. It has been shown in both acute care settings and long-term care facilities that family members prefer to be involved in decision-making and care planning for their next of kin. Therefore, an integrative review was conducted to explore the body of knowledge of FCs' involvement in home-care settings from the FCs' perspective.

Thu, 04/04/2019 - 18:53

Young Adult Carers: The Impact of Caring on Health and Education

Research has shown that young people who care for parents and relatives (young carers and young adult carers) are at greater risk of mental and emotional difficulties and are more likely to do badly at school or college. To explore the difficulties faced by young adult carers (aged 14–25) in the UK, an online survey was conducted. Almost half (45%) of the 295 respondents reported having a mental health problem. The relationship between the extent of caring and perceived mental health problems and the impact of caring responsibilities on work and education were investigated.

Thu, 04/04/2019 - 18:22

Quality of life, anxiety, depression and burden among stroke caregivers: A longitudinal, observational multicentre study

Aim To longitudinally describe stroke caregivers’ quality of life, anxiety, depression and burden and to identify predictors of stroke caregivers’ quality of life, anxiety, depression and burden. Background Caregivers have a key role in stroke survivor care and the first year of caregiving is the most challenging. To give tailored interventions, it is important to capture changes and identify predictors of caregiver quality of life, anxiety, depression and burden during the first year. Design A 12‐month longitudinal study.

Wed, 04/03/2019 - 16:50

Can specially trained community care workers effectively support patients and their families in the home setting at the end of life?

Surveys indicate that many Australians would prefer to die at home, but relatively few do. Recognising that patients and their families may not have the support they need to enable end‐of‐life care at home, a consortium of care providers developed, and received funding to trial, the Palliative Care Home Support Program (PCHSP) across seven health districts in New South Wales, Australia. The programme aimed to supplement end‐of‐life care in the home provided by existing multidisciplinary community palliative care teams, with specialist supportive community care workers (CCWs).

Wed, 04/03/2019 - 16:40

Public expenditure costs of carers leaving employment in England, 2015/2016

In the context of global population ageing, the reconciliation of employment and unpaid caring is becoming an important social issue. The estimation of the public expenditure costs of carers leaving employment is a valuable measure that is of considerable interest to policy makers. In 2012, the Personal Social Services Research Unit estimated that the public expenditure costs of unpaid carers leaving employment in England were approximately £1.3 billion a year, based on the costs of Carer's Allowance and lost tax revenues on forgone incomes.

Wed, 04/03/2019 - 16:26

The coping experiences of spouses of persons with dementia

Aims and objectives: To explore how spouses who are caregivers to persons with dementia experience everyday life 6–12 months after participation in the intervention condition in the Norwegian Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Early Dementia (N‐CORDIAL) study. Background: There is no current medical curative treatment for cognitive impairment and dementia‐associated conditions. These conditions will lead to an increased need for daily assistance and care, as well as greater stress for caregivers.

Wed, 04/03/2019 - 14:17

The role of the memory service in helping carers to prepare for end of life: A mixed methods study

Objectives: The objective of the study is to explore current practice and the role taken by UK memory services in helping carers of people with dementia prepare for the end of life. Methods: We used mixed methods including a survey (48 responses/51% response rate) and semistructured interviews (n = 12) with clinicians working in UK memory services accredited by the Memory Services National Accreditation Programme. We used descriptive statistics to report survey findings and thematically analysed interview and survey qualitative data.

Wed, 04/03/2019 - 13:42

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