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John Wiley & Sons Inc

A collaborative care skills workshop for carers: Can it be delivered in 1 day?

Carers of individuals with eating disorders (EDs) report high levels of burden and distress and describe a number of unmet needs. As a result, a number of interventions have been designed to support carers, including the “Maudsley eating disorder collaborative care skills workshops,” which comprise six 2‐hr workshops delivered over 3 months for parents and carers of people with EDs. The current study aimed to test a proof‐of‐concept that this workshop could be effectively delivered in 1 day. An additional aim was to assess whether the workshop had direct effects on carer skills.

Mon, 04/01/2019 - 14:28

Managing medications for individuals living with a dementia: Evaluating a web‐based information resource for informal carers

Aims The purpose of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of the “Managing Medicines for People with Dementia” (www.dementiameds.com) website for informal carers. Background The management of medications for individuals living with a dementia by informal carers is a neglected area of care. We know that informal carers find it difficult accessing reliable and comprehensive information about medications. We also know that the Internet is a contemporary and growing medium through which consumers access health information.

Mon, 04/01/2019 - 13:53

Psychometric evaluation of the Texas revised inventory of grief in a sample of bereaved family caregivers

The Texas Revised Inventory of Grief (TRIG) was developed to measure the intensity of grief after the death of a close person. It consists of two scales: TRIG I (past behaviors) and TRIG II (present feelings). Because of inconsistencies in previous validations, the instrument needs to be further validated, hence the aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the TRIG in a sample of bereaved family caregivers in Sweden. The TRIG was translated to Swedish according to standard principles, and 129 bereaved family caregivers completed the questionnaire.

Mon, 04/01/2019 - 13:38

Prevalence and predictors of conflict in the families of patients with advanced cancer: A nationwide survey of bereaved family members

Objectives Family conflict has several adverse impacts on caregivers. Thus, there is significant value in determining the prevalence and predictors of family conflict, which can enable the health care provider to intervene if family conflict arises during end-of-life care. Accordingly, we aimed to explore the prevalence and predictors of conflict among the families of patients with advanced cancer who died in palliative care units.

Mon, 04/01/2019 - 12:42

Does informal caregiving affect self‐esteem? Results from a population‐based study of individuals aged 40 and over in Germany from 2002 to 2014

Background While it is known that informal caregiving is associated with care‐derived self‐esteem cross‐sectionally, little is known about the impact of informal caregiving on general self‐esteem longitudinally. Thus, we aimed at examining whether informal caregiving affects general self‐esteem using a longitudinal approach. Methods Data were gathered from a population‐based sample of community‐dwelling individuals aged 40 and over in Germany from 2002 to 2014 (n = 21 271). General self‐esteem was quantified using the Rosenberg scale.

Mon, 04/01/2019 - 12:27

Young-onset Alzheimer dementia: a comparison of Brazilian and Norwegian carers' experiences and needs for assistance

Objectives: Although dementia typically occurs in older people, it can also emerge in people aged younger than 65 years in the form of young‐onset dementia, the most common type of which is Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, few studies have examined the needs of persons with young‐onset AD (YO‐AD) and their families, and cross‐cultural research on the topic is even scarcer. In response, we investigated the situations, experiences and needs for assistance of carers of persons with YO‐AD in Brazil and Norway.

Mon, 04/01/2019 - 11:12

Empowering education of arthroplasty patients' significant others in three Southern European countries

Aims and objectives To examine the relationship between significant others' expected and received knowledge and their background characteristics in three Mediterranean countries (Cyprus, Greece, Spain), all of which deal with economic restrictions, have similar social support systems with the family members acting as family caregivers, and cultural similarities. Background Significant others' role is a key element in the older patients' postoperative recovery.

Mon, 04/01/2019 - 10:33

The chronic sorrow experiences of caregivers of clients with schizophrenia in Taiwan: A phenomenological study

Purpose :The aim of the article is to explore the chronic sorrow experiences of the caregivers of clients with schizophrenia in Taiwan. Design and Methods: Descriptive, phenomenological, and purposive sampling and one‐to‐one, in‐depth, and unstructured interviews were used. Data saturation was achieved after interviewing 12 participants. Narratives were analyzed using Colaizzi's (1978) method.

Sun, 03/31/2019 - 17:14

"What's going to happen when we're gone?" Family caregiving capacity for older people with an intellectual disability in Ireland

Background: Changing family sociodemographic factors, increased life expectancy for people with an intellectual disability, deinstitutionalization and policy prioritization of the family as the principal care provider, presents new challenges to care sustainability. Method: A qualitative study design was employed, entailing focus groups and semistructured interviews, with purposive sampling via the parent study population of the Intellectual Disability Supplement to The Irish Longitudinal Database on Ageing.

Sun, 03/31/2019 - 16:59

A cross‐sectional study on experiences of young adult carers compared to young adult noncarers: parentification, coping and resilience

Background Most young carer studies on parentification, resilience and coping concentrated on child carers up to age 18 years, whereas the group of young adult caregivers (18–24 years) has been neglected. In our study, we focused on these young adult caregivers, who are in a life phase in which young people usually are distancing themselves from their families and are striving for autonomy and freedom. Aim To explore young adult carers’ perceptions of parentification, resilience and coping compared to young adult noncarers.

Sun, 03/31/2019 - 16:54

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