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Dementia care: Intersecting informal family care and formal care systems

Dementia is one of the major causes of disability and dependence amongst older people and previous research has highlighted how the well-being of people with dementia is inherently connected to the quality of their relationships with their informal carers. In turn, these carers can experience significant levels of emotional stress and physical burden from the demands of caring for a family member with dementia, yet their uptake of formal services tends to be lower than in other conditions related to ageing.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

The Simon Heng column

Presents views on social care among children. Overview of a 2005 report by The Education Network about young carers; Decision to be a good parent upon the acquisition of a disability; Reasons why parents should impose responsibilities on their children when they risk damaging their futures.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Keeping carers healthy: the role of community nurses and colleagues

Carers form a substantial proportion of the patients seen by primary care professionals, but their health needs are often overlooked. By recognizing and addressing the needs of the carer as well as the patient, primary care staff (including practice, community and district nurses) can protect the physical and mental health of both. Staff can start by developing simple systems for identifying and recording both patients who are carers, and patients who have carers. Primary health professionals may be able to identify specific opportunities for checking on carers’ health, e.g.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Participation in socially-productive activities, reciprocity and wellbeing in later life : baseline results in England

This paper examines whether participation in social activities is associated with higher levels of wellbeing among post-retirement age people in England, and, if so, whether these relationships are explained by the reciprocal nature of these activities. Cross-sectional analysis of relationships between social activities (including paid work, caring and volunteering) and wellbeing (quality of life, life satisfaction and depression) was conducted among participants of one wave of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) who were of state pension age or older.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Conceptions of daily life in women living with a man suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

To describe conceptions of daily life in women living with a man suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in different stages.

The spouse is often the primary caregiver to someone with COPD, and thus also affected by the consequences of the disease. No previous studies have been found focusing on conceptions of daily life in women living with a man suffering from COPD in different stages.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Making school nurses 'carer aware'

The article reports on a Public Health England (PHE) scheme aimed at identifying and supporting the wellbeing of young carers in England through the help of school nurses and other public health nurses. The scheme was honoured at inaugural awards of the Academy of National Health Service (NHS) Fabulous Stuff. According to PHE lead nurse Wendy Nicholson, many carers do not speak up because they fear that they would be removed from their family homes.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Children caring for their “caregivers”: exploring the caring arrangements in households affected by AIDS in Western Kenya

Reflecting dominant understandings of childhood, many researchers describe orphans as an emotional and financial cost to the households in which they live. This has created a representation of orphans as a burden, not only to their fostering household, but also to society. This article seeks to challenge this representation by exploring children's contributions to their fostering households.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

A qualitative analysis of changes in relationship dynamics and roles between people with cancer and their primary informal carer

It is widely accepted that cancer is an intersubjective experience that impacts upon the psychological well-being of people with cancer and informal carers, as well as on couple relationships. This qualitative study examined the nature and consequences of cancer on the relationship between informal carers and the person with cancer, from the perspective of Australian cancer carers. Sixty-two carers (42 women and 20 men), across a range of cancer types, stages and relationship dyads took part in semi-structured interviews.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:17

Financial well-being of US parents caring for coresident children and adults with developmental disabilities: An age cohort analysis*

Background Understanding how financial well-being changes through the life course of caregiving parents of children with developmental disabilities is critically important. Methods We analyse SIPP (U.S. Census Bureau) data to describe income poverty, asset poverty, income, net worth, and liquid assets of US parents ( N = 753) of children with developmental disabilities. Results Income and asset poverty was greatest for the youngest and oldest parents.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:16

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