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Confronting the care penalty: the case for extending reasonable adjustment rights along the disability/care continuum

Informal caring for adults with disabilities is a source of unacceptable disadvantage in employment, finances, social inclusion, and health; here termed the ‘care penalty’. This penalty can be appropriately tackled through equality law, making care a ground for unlawful discrimination. Carers are not adequately protected from indirectly discriminatory disadvantages by other grounds such as sex and disability. Nor are carers adequately protected by carer-specific provisions such as the UK right to request flexible working.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Family psychoeducation in dementia: From clinical practice to public health

Introduction: Across the last decades, ageing has largely contributed to position dementia as a huge public health problem, reflecting the burden on service users and their social networks, namely families and informal carers. In health services, family issues regarding dementia frequently lead to referrals. However, at service or community levels, family needs are often underestimated or unmet. In this study, we aimed to describe family interventions in dementia and to review the evidence for the efficacy and effectiveness of family psychoeducation in particular.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Gender differences as regards the place of death

Background: The place of death is not the same for men and women. Men have more opportunities for dying at home because of the availability of women as informal carers. In this study we analyse changes in the place of death in the past twenty years. Method: The research population consisted of all patients in four general practices of the Continuous Morbidity Registration who died between 2000 and 2005 inclusive. The following data were collected: place of death, cause of death, acute death or death after a terminal phase, presence of professional care and presence of informal care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

Who cares? – caring for the carers of stroke patients

The author reflects on the employment of informal carers to assist stroke patients in England and Wales in recovering from severe disability. He cites that the National Service Framework for Older People emphasizes the importance of care for stroke patients to be able to live at home. The employment of informal carers was questioned during the National Sentinel Audit for Stroke due to some factors that affect the quality of services and the life of the care taker.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:19

‘It made me realise that I am lucky for what I got’: British young carers encountering the realities of their African peers

Despite a growing number of studies comparing the experiences of young carers in the global North and South, little has been done to explore young carers' representations of their global peers. In this paper we examine the reflections of British young carers after having visited an exhibition displaying photos and stories articulating the caregiving experiences of young carers in Zimbabwe and Kenya. We do this to explore the role of safe and transformative social spaces in facilitating positive identity constructions.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Emotional and Tangible Reciprocity in Middle- and Older-Aged Carers of Adults With Intellectual Disabilities

Reciprocal benefits may exist in relationships between carers and their adult sons/daughters with intellectual disabilities, but the topic has not been widely studied. The present study investigated whether older carers of adult children with intellectual disabilities perceive emotional and tangible reciprocity in their relationships and the association between perceived reciprocity with quality of life. The authors surveyed 91 parental carers (aged 50+ years, mean = 60.8).

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

Sexual Health

Discusses whether national context has influence on the experience and use of highly active anti-retroviral therapy for people living with HIV/AIDS.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

'Just being selfish for my own sake . . .': balancing the views of young adults with intellectual disabilities and their carers in transition planning

In contrast to other forms of family caregiving, becoming the parent or carer of a child with an intellectual disability (ID) implies an ongoing responsibility beyond the attainment of chronological adulthood (Meyers et al., 1985; Todd and Shearn, 1996). At the same time, a discourse of self-determination pervades policy around transition to adult services in ID in England (Valuing People, 2001). In this paper we present a subset of data from a project which aimed to examine how the process of transition from child to adult services in ID is managed.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

PEACEanywhere - Implementing the vision for integrated health and social care

Introduction: The ultimate Vision for Assisted Living is the provision of integrated health and social care, thus allowing health and social care professionals and carers to work in harmony to maximise the people's quality of life. PEACEanywhere one of the Projects under the auspices of the Technology Strategy Board Assisted Living Innovation Platform (ALIP2) sought to progress the vision towards implementation.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:18

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