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Looking after our old: who cares?

Informal care of older people, including a summary of research on the attitudes towards willingness to care for an elderly person among members of the general public aged 20-39 years and 40-59 years. Nurses' attitudes towards elderly care nursing are also discussed. It is suggested that nurses can influence attitudes to the elderly and engage with informal carers. [(BNI unique abstract)] 11 references

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Caregiver perceptions of accomplishment from assisting people with multiple sclerosis

Objectives: Identify factors of informal caregivers, caregiving, and people with multiple sclerosis (MS) receiving assistance that are associated with perceptions of caregiver accomplishment. Methods: National data were collected in a telephone interview survey of 530 informal caregivers and analyzed using an ordered logistic regression model to identify factors associated with perceptions of caregiver accomplishment among 442 of these informal caregivers (caregivers providing all data in their survey responses needed for the regression model). Results: We found t

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

The daily living for informal caregivers with a partner with Parkinson's disease - an interview study of women's experiences of care decisions and self-management

Aim.  To throw light on the lived experiences of female partners of patients with Parkinson disease living at home.

Background.  It is known that daily life with a partner with Parkinson’s disease entails radical upheaval in the family, in particular for the female partner.

Methodology.  A phenomenological hermeneutic approach was used. Interviews with female partners (N = 10) of patients with Parkinson disease who were living at home were conducted in Denmark in 2008. The French philosopher Ricoeur’s theory of interpretation guided the data analysis.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Older carers in the UK: who cares?

Long-term care in the UK relies heavily on informal and unpaid carers. Statistical data regarding the number of carers in the 2001 Census compared with the 2011 Census identify an increase of around 600 000 carers. It is also significant that many of these carers are themselves in their late middle age. The reasons for taking on the caring role are varied, but there are significant potential physical, mental and financial issues associated with taking on the caring role. Positive benefits in terms of support provision for the carer do exist, but support services across the UK are variable.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Dementia caregiving burden and breakdown

This article summarises PhD research undertaken by the author and provides readers with the carer assessment tools validated in the study. [Journal abstract]

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Life with Parkinson's today - room for improvement: results of the UK's largest ever survey of people with Parkinson's and carers

Results of the UK’s largest ever survey of people with Parkinson’s and carers

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Improving user/carer involvement in commissioning and reviewing mental health services

Increasingly there is greater emphasis on user/carer involvement in the delivery of mental health care. There are five levels of participation from none at all to partnership and optimal involvement. A two-year pilot steering group was established by a health authority in December 2000 and criteria for independent evaluation agreed. These included the context, data collection, analysis and report, and recommendations based on the findings to increase user/carer involvement in all aspects of mental health service delivery.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Enhancing carers' experiences of mental health services

This article suggests that relational approaches and carer-centred practice in mental health and other services might alleviate some of the burden on the health – both physical and mental – experienced by informal carers. Unhelpful staff attitudes and poor communication are barriers to effective engagement between professionals and carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Moving toward Medicare home health coverage for people with Alzheimer’s disease

Medicare home health care policy does not incorporate research evidence of effective palliative home care interventions for Alzheimer's disease and dementia patients and caregivers. This article examines the dissonance between the needs and burdens of Alzheimer's disease patients and caregivers, research results on medical and palliative care interventions, and medicalized public policy in the Medicare home health benefit.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Who cares wins? Carers' experiences of assessment since the introduction of the Carers (Equal Opportunities) Act 2004

This paper examines the views of carers who have received a carer’s assessment following the introduction of the Carers (Equal Opportunities) Act 2004. The Act ensured for the first time that a carer’s desire to take part in paid work, education or training, and leisure opportunities was considered. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with carers to illuminate their lived experiences.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09