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Family care

A systematic review of questionnaires used to measure the time spent on family care for frail older people

Time spent on family care of frail older people is difficult to substantiate because of its complex nature. The aim of this study is to check the content validity of existing questionnaires measuring the time spent on caring. Comparing the activities mentioned in the questionnaires with those from other data sources (three validated scales measuring the functional limitations in day-to-day activities and a qualitative study) enabled identification of important drawbacks in the questionnaires reviewed.

Wed, 04/10/2019 - 11:49

The impact of early psychosocial intervention on self‐efficacy of care recipient/carer dyads living with early‐stage dementia—A mixed‐methods study

Aim To evaluate the effect of a targeted community‐based psychosocial intervention on self‐efficacy outcomes for care recipient/carer dyads living with early‐stage dementia. Background There is increasing interest in the role of self‐efficacy and self‐management structures in determining positive outcomes for people with dementia. The assumption is that care recipient/carer dyads who receive early support to identify and adjust to dementia‐related changes will cope better in the long term.

Fri, 04/05/2019 - 10:59

Sustaining care for a parent with dementia: an indefinite and intertwined process

Reproducing care demands and dependency, enacting and affirming values“flying blind” in how and how long to sustain caring This study aimed to understand how adult children sustain caring for persons with dementia (PwDs) within their family and formal care contexts in Canada. Half-day focus groups were conducted with adult daughters and adult sons in Toronto, Canada. Using constructivist grounded theory, we examined both substantive concepts and group dynamics.

Mon, 03/18/2019 - 15:01

Being we and being me: Exploring the needs of Austrian families with caring children

Children and adolescents with caring responsibilities are an uncontested reality in our society. Most are hidden from public view, and they perform a broad range of caring activities for chronically ill or disabled family members. The research literature has accumulated a comprehensive body of knowledge about young carers’ personal needs. However, knowledge and understanding are limited regarding the needs of young carers’ families. This knowledge can contribute to preventing children and adolescents from assuming inappropriate caring roles.

Wed, 10/31/2018 - 16:17

Who is responsible for providing care? Investigating the role of care tasks and past experiences in a cross-sectional survey in the Netherlands

Background: Many countries face substitution from formal to informal care. It is essential that a sufficient number of caregivers, such as family, friends or neighbors, are willing and able to lend care to address the needs of ill or elderly persons.

Fri, 10/19/2018 - 15:55

Supporting people who care for adults with dementia

New coping programme alleviates depression and does it cost effectively. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Family carers in stroke care: examining the relationship between problem-solving, depression and general health

Aims and objectives.  The purpose of this article is to describe the problem-solving abilities of Hong Kong family carers looking after a stroke patients at home and report the relationships between their perceived problem-solving abilities with their depression level, general health status, and the functional recovery of stroke patients.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Talking about care: two sides to the story

Despite its familiarity, the realities of care are both complex and contested. This book offers a unique approach to scrutinising the co-existence of both care and abuse in relationships. It demonstrates ways of increasing critical reflexivity when working with people involved in difficult care relationships. The book emphasises that when talking about care, we need to care about talk. Discourse analysis is introduced as a method of investigating relationships, policy and literature in informal care.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

'The biggest worry is what she's missing out on'

Community Care's exclusive survey of young carers shows that half will spend more than five hours caring for another member of the family this Christmas. The authors talks to one young carer about her plans for the Christmas holidays. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Bridging troubled waters: family caregivers, transitions and long term care

Families are the bedrock of long-term care, but policymakers have traditionally considered them “informal” caregivers, as they are not part of the formal paid caregiving workforce. As chronic and long-term care systems have become more complex and as more demanding tasks have been shifted to families, this view is no longer sustainable. The care transition process offers a critical opportunity to treat family caregivers as important care partners. Enhancing their involvement, training, and support will contribute to reducing unnecessary rehospitalizations and improving patient outcomes.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:22