Skip to content

Toggle service links

You are here

  1. Home
  2. Family care

Family care

Aggression and trauma experiences among carer-relatives of people with psychosis

Background: Exposure to aggression and associated psychological outcomes are poorly characterised among carer-relatives of people with psychosis.

Method: Carer-relatives (N = 106) completed questionnaires assessing socio-demographics and perceived prevalence of aggression in their caring role in the last 12 months. Carers exposed to moderate–severe levels of aggression were re-approached to assess PTSD and coping strategies.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Living with moderate or severe traumatic brain injury: the meaning of family members' experiences

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has long-lasting consequences not only for the individual with the injury but also for family members. The aim of this study is to elucidate the meaning of family members' experiences of living with an individual with moderate or severe TBI. The data have been collected by means of qualitative research interviews with eight family member participants. A phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation (Ricouer, 1976) of the data reveal that family members struggle with their own suffering while showing compassion for the injured person.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

An intergroup communication approach to understanding the function of compliance, outgroup typicality, and honest explanations in distant caregiving relationships : validation of a health-care communication scale

This study examines distant caregiving relationships to achieve a better understanding of the function of compliance, outgroup typicality, and honest explanations from an intergroup communication perspective. With more families living at a distance due to our increasingly mobile society, long-distance caregiving (LDC) is a unique and growing caregiving situation that caregivers must face. LDC differs for caregivers and patients in close geographic proximity due to lack of availability, lack of intimate understanding of the caregiving needs at hand, and unknown financial burdens.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Service use and cost associated with caring for people with serious mental illness

Background: Patients with severe and enduring mental health problems are increasingly being cared for in the community. Whilst community services continue to develop it is recognized that family members and friends play an important role in the care process.

Aims: (i) to assess the level of service use and associated costs of carers, (ii) to compare service use to that pertaining in the general population, and (iii) to identify carer characteristics that are predictive of cost variations.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Confidence boost for carers

The Caring with Confidence scheme, launched in April 2009, is described. The scheme had been designed to improve support for carers in England over 18 by equipping them with skills to help them in their role. The scheme operates group sessions and online interactive sessions on subjects such as the emotions involved in caring for someone and how to develop coping strategies.

The author examines how a government-backed scheme is helping to give carers the skills to sustain them in their roles.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:09

Occupational therapy for caregivers of people with dementia: a review of the United Kingdom literature

Introduction: Caring for a family member with dementia is associated with a wide range of challenges. The national strategy for caregivers highlights the growing need for health professionals to provide support to caregivers of people with dementia. This review aimed to identify the evidence and current role of occupational therapists in supporting caregivers of people with dementia in the community.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:08

Public interest and private concern: the role of family carers for people suffering mental illness in the twenty first century

Objectives: This paper looks to examine the emerging role of carers as essential components in the management of individuals affected by severe mental illness in the context of modern legal and health policy environments. Conclusions: Cultural and legal concepts of confidentiality within the doctor–patient relationship are complex.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:08

Caring for and caring about: Disentangling the caregiver effect and the family effect

Besides patients’ health and well-being, healthcare interventions may affect the well-being of significant others. Such ‘spill over effects’ in significant others may be distinguished in two distinct effects: (i) the caregiving effect and (ii) the family effect. The first refers to the welfare effects of providing informal care, i.e., the effects of caring for someone who is ill. The second refers to a direct influence of the health of a patient on others’ well-being, i.e., the effects of caring about other people.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:08

Page 10 of 10