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Family care

Unsung heroes who put their lives at risk? : informal caring, health and neighbourhood attachment

Background Previous studies have highlighted the effects of informal caring on mental health, but evidence for its wider impact remains scant. We explored associations between informal care and a range of health (and health-related) measures. We also considered previously neglected differences between informal care ‘at home’ and care elsewhere, along with neighbourhood attachment as a possible modifier of the associations we found.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

More than a job: working carers: evidence from the 2001 census

In the future most people's lives will include at least one episode of unpaid caring. Find out the facts behind the people who balance their job with caring for a relative or friend.

  • Already, 2.5 million people in England and Wales combine paid work with unpaid caring for a partner, relative or friend who is ill, frail or has a disability.

  • 1.5 million carers work full-time, and of those, 140,000 care for 50+ hours per week.

  • 90% of working carers are aged 30+ - in their prime employment years.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:13

Ethnicity and family support

'They look after their own' is a phrase with which we are all familiar but to what extent do ethnic and minority groups care for and support for their family members? Given the current focus on carers, Rosalind Willis in this article presents the findings of a preliminary study into ethnicity and family support, and highlights that what is generally defined as 'support' may perhaps be interpreted differently within and because of different cultures. 

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Caring for a relative with dementia: family caregiver burden

This paper is a report of part of a study to investigate the burden experienced by families giving care to a relative with dementia, the consequences of care for the mental health of the primary caregiver and the strategies families use to cope with the care giving stressors. The cost of caring for people with dementia is enormous, both monetary and psychological. Partners, relatives and friends who take care of patients experience emotional, physical and financial stress, and care giving demands are central to decisions on patient institutionalisation.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Care at home for people with dementia: as in a total institution?

This article examines three kinds of social relationship likely to be present when people with dementia are cared for at home by relatives or friends: custodial care, an intimate relationship, and home-life. Using Goffman's three defining aspects of custodial care – routinisation, surveillance and mortification of the self – the paper examines whether these characterised the care of people with dementia at home and, if so, whether they conflicted with the intimate relationship and with home-life.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Cost effectiveness of a manual based coping strategy programme in promoting the mental health of family carers of people with dementia (the START (STrAtegies for RelaTives) study): a pragmatic randomised controlled trial

Objective To assess whether the START (STrAtegies for RelatTives) intervention added to treatment as usual is cost effective compared with usual treatment alone. Design Cost effectiveness analysis nested within a pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Setting Three mental health and one neurological outpatient dementia service in London and Essex, UK. Participants Family carers of people with dementia. Intervention Eight session, manual based, coping intervention delivered by supervised psychology graduates

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:12

Improving support for young carers: family-focused approaches

This paper looks at the work of 18 local authorities to create systems and support to help families with young carers. It explores some of the positive outcomes from taking a family-focused approach and showcases good practice in this field.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

The quality of life of carers of patients with severe lung disease

Severe lung disease is known to affect the lives of not only the sufferer but also his/her family. This qualitative phenomenological study identified seven patients with severe lung disease and studied the quality of life of their carers (five female, two male) who were not fully employed, living in the same house or nearby. In a semistructured interview, the carers were asked about looking after their spouse or relative, whether they had support and the effect of caring on their health and finances.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

Meeting the needs of family carers: an evaluation of three home-based palliative care services in Australia

While policy promotes comprehensive assessment of family career needs and a plan to adequately meet family career needs within palliative care, there is a lack of studies in the Australian context which examine the current type of assessment and types of care provided to family carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

A systematic review of telehealth tools and interventions to support family caregivers

We conducted a systematic review of studies employing telehealth interventions which focused on family caregivers’ outcomes. The Embase, CINHAL, Cochrane and PubMed databases were searched using combinations of keywords including “telehealth,” “telemedicine,” “telecare,” “telemonitoring,” “caregiver” and “family.” The initial search produced 4205 articles, of which 65 articles met the inclusion criteria. The articles included 52 experimental studies, 11 evaluation studies, one case study and one secondary analysis.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:11

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