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Family-friendly reform of employment law in the UK: an overstretched flexibility

This paper provides a critical assessment of the family-friendly reform of employment law in the UK. It begins with the analysis of the EU policies on work-life balance as the important context of the reform in the UK. The second part of the paper provides and outline of the family-friendly provisions introduced by the Labour and Coalition Governments between 1997 and 2015 and investigates the rationale behind the reform. The paper questions the consistency of the approach to the family-friendly reform of employment law adopted by the Labour and Coalition governments.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Carer experiences of life after stroke – a qualitative analysis

Aims and objectives. Carers' experiences of caring for a stroke survivor were explored, including reactions and changes in their lives.

Method. A phenomenological approach was taken to the collection and analysis of data. Semi-structured interviews lasting an average of 43 min were carried out with nine informal carers in their own homes. All were married to someone who had survived a stroke.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

Sleep-wake disturbances in patients with cancer and their informal caregivers: A matter of dyads

Background: Changes in habitual sleep are among the most remarkable and important concerns of both patients with cancer and their informal carers. A dyadic approach in the assessment and management of sleep problems in patients and carers is a promising method of exploring concurrent sleep disturbances and establishing associations between sleep and sleep-impairing factors that may co-vary in the members of the dyad. The purpose of the present mini-review article was to discuss the current evidence, as well as highlight areas where future research is warranted.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

The long-term consequences of partnership dissolution for support in later life in the United Kingdom

There has long been an interest in the United Kingdom about whether and how changes in family life affect support for older people, but nevertheless the consequences of partnership dissolution for late-life support have been little researched. Using data from the British Household Panel Study (1991–2003), this study investigated the longitudinal association between partnership dissolution and two types of support for 1,966 people aged 70 or more years: (i) informal support from children in the form of contacts and help (e.g.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:24

An assessment of the relationship between informal caring and quality of life in older community-dwelling adults - more positives than negatives?

The main objective of the study was to apply the recently developed Index of Capability (ICECAP-O) instrument to measure and value the quality of life of a representative sample of the older South Australian population (aged ≥ 65 years) according to carer status. A Health Omnibus survey including the ICECAP-O instrument, carer status (informal carer vs. non-carer) and several socio-demographic questions was administered in 2009 as a face-to-face interview to 789 individuals aged 65 years or older in their own homes.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Working but not employed: Mothers of adults with intellectual disability as hidden workers

Background Earlier research shows that nonemployed mothers of children with intellectual disability (ID) have lower wellbeing than employed mothers. This study explored why and to what extent these mothers did not participate in the labour market.

Method An in-depth interview was employed, and 18 working-age and nonemployed mothers in Taiwan who had an adult child with ID were interviewed in their homes between July 2009 and May 2010.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Just the job for young carers

Readers respond to a question of how nursing can be made more attractive to younger people.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

A Knowledge-Based Multimedia Telecare System to Improve the Provision of Formal and Informal Care for the Elderly and Disabled

We have developed a knowledge-based multimedia telecare system, based on a multimedia PC connected by ISDN at 128 kbit/s. The user display is a television. Multimedia material is accessed through a browser-based interface. A remote-control handset is used as the main means of interaction, to ensure ease of use and overcome any initial reservations resulting from ‘technophobia’ on the part of the informal carer. The system was used in 13 family homes and four professional sites in Northern Ireland. The evaluations produced positive comments from the informal carers.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Well-being among employed and non-employed caregiving women in Taiwan

This study addressed various groups of non-employed/employed and non-caring/caring women in Taiwan. Data from the 2006 National Taiwanese Women Survey (at age 16–64, n= 6,017) were analysed to determine whether there are differences in terms of well-being, as measured by self-rated health and family life satisfaction, between women who work and/or care and between different carer groups. Other factors associated with well-being of carers of young children (n= 1,697) were also analysed.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

Which outcomes should we measure in adult epilepsy trials? The views of people with epilepsy and informal carers

Objective: So that informed treatment decisions can be made, clinical trials need to evaluate treatments against domains that are important to people with epilepsy (PWE), their carers, and clinicians. Health professionals have identified domains of importance to them via the International League Against Epilepsy's Commission on Outcome Measurement (COME). However, patients and carers have not been systematically asked.

Thu, 07/20/2017 - 15:23

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