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Community engagement

Researchers at WELS work hand in hand with communities to co-produce research that empowers and enables those communities. This is research with and for rather than on or about communities employing participatory and empowerment research approaches. In all of our research groups, community members play a leading role in setting research priorities, carrying out research, communicating findings and making sure research is heard where it can have the greatest impact.

Centres


Groups

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The Contemporary Youth Cultures and Transitions Research Group

The Contemporary Youth Cultures and Transitions Research Group brings together academic researchers – working across and between the boundaries of criminology, human geography, psychology, sociology, and education studies – alongside practitioners and youth activists.

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The Reproduction, Sexualities and Sexual Health Research Group

The Reproduction, Sexualities and Sexual Health Research Group (RSSH) explores five key areas: reproductive control, HIV/AIDS, sexuality & disability, the experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual & transgender (LGBT+) people and pregnancy & childbirth.

The Social History of Learning Disability Group

The Social History of Learning Disability Research Group (SHLD) researches and disseminates learning disability history in ways which are inclusive of people with learning disabilities, their carers, relatives and advocates.


Networks

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The Carer Research and Knowledge Exchange Network

The Carer Research and Knowledge Exchange Network (CAREN) develops and provides knowledge exchange resources for all those across the globe who require any form of carer-related knowledge.

The Critical Autism Network

The Critical Autism Network aims to develop a challenge to dominant understandings of autism as a neurological deficit, instead focusing on autism as an identity that is discursively produced within specific sociocultural contexts.